Strategic Marketing Plan for Globalisation for Spritzer Bhd

| January 12, 2016

Order Details;

The report should be in three main parts:

1 Undertake an external environmental analysis looking at an overview of the international business environment with particular attention paid to factors which will impact the global bottled water industry. Evaluate a range of key themes relating to marketing internationally within the industry. You will also need to consider any themes that particularly apply to Spritzer.
2 You should propose strategic marketing responses to the themes you have identified in your environmental analysis that you judge as having the greatest potential impact on the process to expand internationally.
3 Critically analyse 2-3 international markets Spritzer can seek entry into as the first step towards eventual globalisation. One of the markets should be outside of SE Asia.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Marks will be awarded for the clear analysis and interpretation of the case in respect of:

• Understanding and analysing the key themes within International marketing
• Applying key theoretical approaches to the case study;
• Clarity of expression and reasoning with evidence of analytical rigour; effective interpretation of data and other relevant information
• Presenting a workable strategic marketing plan for Spritzer Bhd to venture overseas.

Summative Assessment

A case study about Spritzer Bhd will be provided. You will be expected to produce a 3000 word report on aiding the company to participate in global marketing

 

Spritzer Bhd is Malaysia’s largest bottled water producer. The company commands a market share of 45% in the Malaysian mineral water and drinking water segment.

 

You will be given a case study which outlines some basic information about the company.  You are expected to do some research into the company and the industry in order to be able to effectively undertake the tasks below.  A good start point is the company website

 

Spritzer Bhd is planning to expand internationally with the ultimate aim of becoming a global brand.  You are to produce a report to advise them on aspects of marketing which will aid them in making the first step towards globalisation.

 

The report should be in three main parts

 

  • Undertake an external environmental analysis looking at an overview of the international business environment with particular attention paid to factors which will impact the global bottled water industry. Evaluate a range of key themes relating to marketing internationally within the industry.  You will also need to consider any themes that particularly apply to Spritzer.
  • You should propose strategic marketing responses to the themes you have identified in your environmental analysis that you judge as having the greatest potential impact on the process to expand internationally.
  • Critically analyse 2-3 international markets Spritzer can seek entry into as the first step towards eventual globalisation. One of the markets should be outside of SE Asia.

 

GUIDANCE

 

Please note the aim of this work is not to produce an analysis of Spritzer but to analyse the environment within which the company operates.  The reason for providing you with a case study is to kick-start your report. The information in the case study is in itself insufficient to do the report. You are expected to do indepth research to complete the report.  Your task is to produce a report which analyses the global environment within which this company will operate and identify how their marketing strategy should respond to those key themes.  At the very minimum your marketing response should include references to generic market strategies and market entry strategies with any position that you adopt fully supported by your analyses.

 

Please note you will not be awarded marks simply for writing information from the case study.  Any references taken from the case should be brief, to either establish the background to the organisation or to support an argument being made

 

A serious attempt must be made at all components of assessment for this module.

 

 

Assessment Criteria

 

Marks will be awarded for the clear analysis and interpretation of the case in respect of:

 

  • Understanding and analysing the key themes within International marketing
  • Applying key theoretical approaches to the case study;
  • Clarity of expression and reasoning with evidence of analytical rigour; effective interpretation of data and other relevant information
  • Presenting a workable strategic marketing plan for Spritzer Bhd to venture overseas.

 

Marking Scheme

These may be weighted for different assessments 80-100

 

70-79

 

60-69

 

50-59

 

Narrow Fail  40-49

 

(20-39) (0-19)
Class of Masters Award Distinction Merit Pass Fail Non-Serious Attempt
Knowledge and understanding

 

Command of the topic, unusual creativity, perception and insight, all suggesting that work should be published in an academic forum Demonstrates command of the topic by showing creativity, perception and insight – a serious contribution to the academic debate Demonstrates a well informed understanding of the topic by showing creativity and insight – a serious contribution to the academic debate Understanding of contemporary academic debate, with some creative input and insight Descriptive while demonstrating reasonable understanding Limited/poor understanding demonstrated

Any creative input is some what off the point

Non submission (0)

 

Non serious attempt e.g. answer irrelevant to set question or completely insufficient

Content and Exploration of theories and ideas

 

Outstanding selection that makes a substantial contribution to academic debate

 

Outstanding selection from a wide relevant and innovative range of perspectives and sources Selection from a wide and relevant range of perspectives and sources that draws upon contemporary academic debate Relevant selection from a good and relevant range of perspectives and sources

Sources mostly well-integrated into the overall argument

Relevant but not wide selection from a reasonable range of sources Some/minimal relevant sources and limited topic coverage Non submission (0)

 

Non serious attempt e.g. answer irrelevant to set question or completely insufficient

Analysis and

Synthesis

 

 

 

 

Outstanding use of source material

Excellent argument that is of the highest academic quality

Sources very well integrated into the overall argument

Clear, well structured argument that is well crafted and cogent

Sources well-integrated into the overall argument

Clear, cogent and well-structured argument

Mostly clear, cogent and well-structured argument Sources sometimes properly integrated into the argument

Some tendencies towards a clear and cogent argument

Sources only occasionally/not at all integrated into the argument

Some/minimal structure and argument present

Non submission (0)

 

Non serious attempt e.g. answer irrelevant to set question or completely insufficient

Critical engagement and analysis

 

 

Critical distance and outstanding analysis of the question, to a high degree of excellence Critical distance and outstanding analysis of the question Critical distance and sound analysis of the question Demonstrates criticality and generally good analysis Some successful analysis with a tendency to accept the source material at face value Limited/poor analysis and criticality with reliance on limited sources Non submission (0)

 

Non serious attempt e.g. answer irrelevant to set question or completely insufficient

 

Technical skills and referencing

 

Referencing impeccable using appropriate conventions

No errors in grammar or spelling

Referencing clear and accurate using appropriate conventions

Virtually no errors in grammar or spelling

Referencing clear and accurate using appropriate conventions

Near perfect

Grammar and spelling, with only a few errors

Referencing clear and mostly accurate using appropriate conventions

Good grammar and spelling with some errors

References adequate but clearer and/or more references needed.

Reasonable grammar and spelling but with several notable errors

References limited/inappropriate

Many errors in grammar and spelling, making it difficult or impossible to read

Non submission (0)

 

Non serious attempt e.g. answer irrelevant to set question or completely insufficient

 

 

 

Academic writing conventions –

This piece contains hyperlinks for more detailed discussion.

Academic writing typically does not contain elements, such as

  1. personal language
  2. judgmental words
  3. emotive language

and as a result it is characterised as impersonal and objective. However, academic writing still requires you to develop an argument and express your opinion about issues. For example, by asking you  questions such as:

What do you think?
Evaluate…
Do you agree?
Argue in favour of or against…

lecturers and tutors are seeking your opinion – what you think about a particular issue, event, or theory. In addition, academic articles or books usually contain opinions in the form of:

 

interpretations of results
theories
evaluations
conclusions
hypotheses

So it is a convention of academic writing to express arguments and opinions, yet this convention also requires that these arguments and opinions incorporate the objective and impersonal style that is a significant feature of academic writing. In academic writing, arguments should imply impartial and sound judgement through the use of rational, impersonal and unemotional language.

Another convention of academic writing is the use of evidence to support the arguments being presented: arguments cannot be presented without supporting evidence or they may sound as if they are just the writer’s opinion. This evidence cannot be anecdotal evidence but must be already published or known information presented by authorities in the field. It must be integrated expertly into the structure of your overall argument, (see Integrating evidence into your own writing  below)

paragraphs and into your sentences. Certain conventions in academic writing dictate how this supporting evidence is cited or referenced. These conventions ensure that readers of your work are clearly able to find and evaluate the sources of your evidence.

The expression of opinion and argument is an essential part of academic writing.

 

Integrating evidence into your own writing

When integrating the evidence you’ve gathered into your essay, you must first look at your essay plan to decide where evidence needs to be placed in relation to the points you’re making. Then you need to look at the particular paragraph in which a piece of evidence belongs to decide how it can be integrated, remembering that its role will be to support or expand on a point you’ve already made in your own words within that paragraph. In the paragraph below, you’ll notice that evidence has been paraphrased or directly quoted and placed in a position that allows it to extend the point the writer is making in the topic sentence.

One phenomenon that can impact greatly on the effectiveness of groups is that as group sizes increase there is a tendency for the effort put in by the group to be less than the average effort put in by individuals engaged on the same task separately (Gabrenya, Latane & Wang 1981; Albanese & Van Fleet 1985). The phenomenon has been described using various terms. Writers influenced by industrial economics describe it as the ‘free-rider problem’, where the collective nature of the ‘contract’ obscures the fact of one member failing to honour their part of the contract (Albanese & Van Fleet 1985, p230). Writers who are organisational psychologists tend to label the phenomenon as ‘social loafing’ and typically define it as “one where everyone puts in a little less” (Gabrenya, Latane & Wang 1981, p120). Whatever the terminology used to describe this phenomenon, it is one that is problematic for groups. topic sentence

(note the use of “can” so
that the author is using
hedging language

expansion

integration of paraphrased material

integration of paraphrased and quoted material

summarising & transition to next paragraph

 

There are no rules about how many indirect and direct quotations you should use in your essay, but it is generally agreed that the use of indirect quotation (summaries and paraphrases) indicates a higher level of understanding. Try to paraphrase and summarise where possible, and only use direct quotations when you cannot put the ideas into your own words, where the quotation has clever wording, or where they are the exact words of some auspicious authority.

Propose an argument

The position adopted in the argument (it is argued . . .) – what you think overall
– Propositions (Because . . .) – reasons that support your position
– Arguments (As . . .) – supporting arguments that back up each of your propositions
– Evidence (Supported by . . .) – supporting evidence to back up your arguments

(N.B. some people also refer to “arguments” as “minor propositions” – in either case, the idea is that this tier is designed to back up your prior “propositions”.)

When put into use, you get something like this:

In academic terms a simple statement such as “Manchester United are the best team” will need refining.  Does the writer mean they are the best team in the world? Or perhaps the best in Europe?  Or perhaps it could mean they are the best team in their league this week?  What if they lost their last two games, what if they are not currently top of the Premiership?  Does it mean they are more successful at winning leagues, or perhaps cups, than any other team.  Does it mean they are the most entertaining to watch, the best value for money, the most profitable etc?

 

If you stick to UK comparisons and say Manchester United have been the best (most successful) team in English football history , you would be incorrect, as Liverpool have won the European Championship and the highest football league in England as many times as Manchester United. The Premiership was previously called the First Divison and Liverpool won it 18 times.

 So terms of an argument need to be made clear

State the position “It is argued that since the start of the English Premier League in 1992 Man U have been the best team in the Premiership”
State the propositions (reasons) “Because in Premiership matches they’re the most successful on the pitch” and “because they are the most valuable team”
State supporting argument “This success is shown by them winning the Premiership title more times than any other team”and by them having a greater market value than any other team in the UK.
State supporting evidence “According to Sporting Chronicle (2010) Manchester United have won the Premiership title eleven times, compared to the next most successful teams, Arsenal and Chelsea, who have each won the title three times and in a recent survey by Deloitte (2010) they had a higher market value than any other football team in the UK

 

This argument can be made in just one sentence.  It is argued that since the start of the English Premier League (Premiership) in 1992 Manchester United has been the most successful team in the Premiership in terms of on the pitch performance and market value as evidenced by them winning the Premiership title eleven times compared to the next most successful teams, Arsenal and Chelsea, who have each won the title three times. (Sporting Chronicle, 2010).   Additionally they have been valued by Deloitte (2010) at £1.8 billion compared to the next most valuable team, Arsenal who had a value of £1.1bn”

This s now a clear, unambiguous argument supported by objective evidence.  As you can see it has become a substantially longer argument but it is academically correct.  The use of the phrase “it is argued that” at the start is an example of the use of a hedging phrase.

Define your terms

Do not assume the reader knows what you mean.

 

 

For example rather than write a statement such as “globalisation is a good opportunity for UK businesses”, you should define your term and unless you are 100% sure that what you are saying is a fact you should use a “hedging phrase” – such as “many authors have claimed….” “it can be argued that….”   For more details see the section below on hedging.

 

In an academic work to make the above point good practice would be to produce a sentence along the following lines  it has been argued that globalisation – which has been defined by Smith (2008) as “worldwide movement toward economic, financial, trade, and communications integration – is a major opportunity for many UK firms (UKTI, 2010). 

 

 

Q What is wrong with the following sentence?  “Positive reinforcement is the best way for companies to use Social Media”

 

A The key weaknesses in this sentence are that it is very definite about a subject which there is no absolutely correct answer (so a hedging phrase needs to be used) and there are two terms which need to be defined “positive reinforcement” and “social media”.

As an exercise do some research and present the above sentence as an academically supportable paragraph.

Hedging

It is often believed that academic writing, particularly scientific writing, is factual, simply to convey facts and information. However it is now recognised that an important feature of academic writing is the concept of cautious language, often called “hedging” or “vague language”. In other words, it is necessary to make decisions about your stance on a particular subject, or the strength of the claims you are making. Different subjects prefer to do this in different ways.

Language used in hedging:

1. Introductory verbs: e.g. seem, tend, look like, appear to be, think, believe, doubt, be sure, indicate, suggest
2. Certain lexical verbs e.g. believe, assume, suggest
3. Certain modal verbs: e.g. will, must, would, may, might, could
4. Adverbs of frequency e.g. often, sometimes, usually
4. Modal adverbs e.g. certainly, definitely, clearly, probably, possibly, perhaps, conceivably,
5. Modal adjectives e.g. certain, definite, clear, probable, possible
6. Modal nouns e.g. assumption, possibility, probability
7. That clauses e.g. It could be the case that .
e.g. It might be suggested that .
e.g. There is every hope that .
8. To-clause + adjective e.g. It may be possible to obtain .
e.g. It is important to develop .
e.g. It is useful to study .

 

 

Features of academic writing

Introduction

Try this exercise.

Academic writing in English is linear, which means it has one central point or theme with every part contributing to the main line of argument, without digressions or repetitions. Its objective is to inform rather than entertain. As well as this it is in the standard written form of the language.There are eight main features of academic writing that are often discussed. Academic writing is to some extent: complex, formal, objective, explicit, hedged, and responsible. It uses language precisely and accurately.

Complexity

Written language is relatively more complex than spoken language. Written language has longer words, it is lexically more dense and it has a more varied vocabulary. It uses more noun-based phrases than verb-based phrases. Written texts are shorter and the language has more grammatical complexity, including more subordinate clauses and more passives.

Complexity

Formality

Academic writing is relatively formal. In general this means that in an essay you should avoid colloquial words and expressions.

Formality

Precision

In academic writing, facts and figures are given precisely.

Precision

Objectivity

Written language is in general objective rather than personal. It therefore has fewer words that refer to the writer or the reader. This means that the main emphasis should be on the information that you want to give and the arguments you want to make, rather than you. For that reason,  academic writing tends to use nouns (and adjectives), rather than verbs (and adverbs).

Objectivity

Explicitness

Academic writing is explicit about the relationships int he text. Furthermore, it is the responsibility of the writer in English to make it clear to the reader how the various parts of the text are related. These connections can be made explicit by the use of different signalling words.

Explicitness

Accuracy

Academic writing uses vocabulary accurately. Most subjects have words with narrow specific meanings. Linguistics distinguishes clearly between “phonetics” and “phonemics”; general English does not.

Accuracy

Hedging

In any kind of academic writing you do, it is necessary to make decisions about your stance on a particular subject, or the strength of the claims you are making. Different subjects prefer to do this in different ways.

A technique common in certain kinds of academic writing is known by linguists as a ‘hedge’.

Hedging

Responsibility

In academic writing you must be responsible for, and must be able to provide evidence and justification for, any claims you make. You are also responsible for demonstrating an understanding of any source texts you use.

Responsibility

Keith Brighty, York St John University January 2011

Reference:

Uni Learning (2000) available from http://unilearning.uow.edu.au/academic/4ai.html (accessed 15 January 2011).

Using English for academic purposes (2010) available from http://www.uefap.com/index.htm (accessed 15 January 2011).

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