Sociology (Due 20 Hours) 1) Minimum 6 full pages (No word count per page)- Follow the 3 x 3 rule: minimum three paragraphs per part.              Part 1:

Sociology (Due 20 Hours) 1) Minimum 6 full pages (No word count per page)- Follow the 3 x 3 rule: minimum three paragraphs per part.

 

           Part 1: minimum 1 page

           Part 2: minimum 1 page

           Part 3: minimum 1 page

           Part 4: minimum 1 page

           Part 5: minimum 1 page

           Part 6: minimum 1 page

   Submit 1 document per part

2)¨******APA norms

         All paragraphs must be narrative and cited in the text- each paragraph

         Bulleted responses are not accepted

         Don’t write in the first person 

         Don’t copy and paste the questions.

         Answer the question objectively, do not make introductions to your answers, answer it when you start the paragraph

Submit 1 document per part

3)****************************** It will be verified by Turnitin (Identify the percentage of exact match of writing with any other resource on the internet and academic sources, including universities and data banks) 

********************************It will be verified by SafeAssign (Identify the percentage of similarity of writing with any other resource on the internet and academic sources, including universities and data banks)

4) Minimum 3 references per part not older than 5 years

All references must be consistent with the topic-purpose-focus of the parts. Different references are not allowed.

5) Identify your answer with the numbers, according to the question. Start your answer on the same line, not the next

Example:

Q 1. Nursing is XXXXX

Q 2. Health is XXXX

6) You must name the files according to the part you are answering: 

Example:

Part 1.doc 

Part 2.doc

__________________________________________________________________________________

Part 1

 

Topic:  Symbolic Interactionism 

Of the three theoretical perspectives i chapter 1

1. Which one would you prefer to use if you were a sociologist? ( Symbolic Interactionism)

2. Explain why

Part 2 

  

1. What two agents of socialization have  influenced you the most?  (Read Chapter 3 )

2. Explain their influence on specific attitudes, beliefs, values, or other of your orientation to life 

Part 3

  

1. Apply the functionalist perspective by explaining how deviance ca be functional for society, 

2. How mainstream values can produce deviance (strain theory)

3. How social class is related to crime (illegitimate opportunities)

 

Part 4

  

1. How do slavery, caste, estate,and class systems of social stratification differ?

Part 5

  

1. What is your position on the “nature versus nurture” (biology or culture) debate? 

2. What material in Chapter 10 supports your position.

 

Part 6

  

1. How have your experiences in education (including teachers and assignments) influenced your goals, attitudes, and values?

2. How have your classmates influenced you? Essentials of Sociology

Thirteenth Edition

Chapter 3

Socialization

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Learning Objectives (1 of 3)

3.1 Explain how feral, isolated, and institutionalized children help us understand that “society makes us human.”

3.2 Use the ideas and research of Cooley (looking-glass self), Mead (role taking), and Piaget (reasoning) to explain socialization into the self and mind.

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Learning Objectives (2 of 3)

3.3 Explain how the development of personality and morality and socialization into emotions are part of how “society makes us human.”

3.4 Discuss how gender messages from the family, peers, and the mass media teach us society’s gender map.

3.5 Explain how the family, the neighborhood, religion, day care, school, peer groups, and the workplace are agents of socialization.

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Learning Objectives (3 of 3)

3.6 Explain what total institutions are and how they resocialize people.

3.7 Identify major divisions of the life course, and discuss the sociological significance of the life course.

3.8 Understand why we are not prisoners of socialization.

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Society Makes Us Human (1 of 2) 3.1 Explain how feral, isolated, and institutionalized children help us understand that “society makes us human.”

The relative influence of heredity and the environment in human behavior has fascinated and plagued researchers. Twins intrigue researchers, especially twins who were separated at birth.

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Society Makes Us Human (2 of 2)

Feral children

Isolated children

Institutionalized children

Deprived animals

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Isolated Children

Language is the key to culture

Culture makes us human

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Institutionalized Children (1 of 2)

The Skeels/Dye Experiment

“High intelligence” depends on early, close relations

Data confirmed in Romania’s orphanages

Genie

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Institutionalized Children (2 of 2)

Children at an orphanage in Kaliyampoondi, India, sleeping in their dormitory. The way children are treated affects their ability to function as adults, even their ability to reason and to relate to others.

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Deprived Animals

Harlows’ experiments with rhesus monkeys

Confirms data from isolated humans

Socialization

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Socialization into the Self and Mind 3.2 Use the ideas and research of Cooley (looking-glass self), Mead (role taking), and Piaget (reasoning) to explain socialization into the self and mind.

Cooley and the Looking-Glass Self

Mead and Role Taking

Piaget and the Development of Reasoning

Global Aspects of the Self and Reasoning

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Cooley and the Looking-Glass Self

We imagine how we appear to those around us

We interpret others’ reactions

We develop a self-concept

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Mead and Role Taking (1 of 2)

Mead analyzed taking the role of the other as an essential part of learning to be a full-fledged member of society. At first, we are able to take the role only of significant others, as this child is doing. Later we develop the capacity to take the role of the generalized other, which is essential not only for cooperation but also for the control of antisocial desires.

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Figure 3.1 How We Learn to Take the Role of the Other: Mead’s Three Stages

Chart showing the transition through Mead’s developmental stages.

Source: By the author.

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14

Mead and Role Taking (2 of 2)

To help his students understand the term generalized other, Mead used baseball as an illustration. Why are team sports and organized games excellent examples to use in explaining this concept?

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Piaget and the Development of Reasoning (1 of 2)

Sensorimotor stage

Preoperational stage

Concrete operational stage

Formal operational stage

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Piaget and the Development of Reasoning (2 of 2)

Jean Piaget featured on a Swiss stamp.

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Global Aspects of the Self and Reasoning

Self may develop earlier than Mead suggests

Stages not as distinct as Piaget concluded

Some people seem to get stuck in the concreteness of the third stage

Never reach fourth stage of abstract thinking

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Learning Personality, Morality, and Emotions 3.3 Explain how the development of personality and morality and socialization into emotions are part of how “society makes us human.”

Freud and the Development of Personality

Kohlberg and the Development of Morality

Socialization into Emotions

What We Feel

Society Within Us: The Self and Emotions as Social Control

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Freud and the Development of Personality (1 of 2)

Freud and the development of personality

id, ego, superego

Sociological evaluation

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Freud and the Development of Personality (2 of 2)

Shown here is Sigmund Freud in 1931 as he poses for a sculptor in Vienna, Austria. Although Freud was one of the most influential theorists of the twentieth century, most of his ideas have been discarded.

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Kohlberg and the Development of Morality

Kohlberg’s theory

Criticisms of Kohlberg

Research with babies

Cultural relativity of morality

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Socialization into Emotions (1 of 2)

Global emotions

Anger, distrust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise

Expressing emotions

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Socialization into Emotions (2 of 2)

What emotions are these people expressing? Are these emotions global? Is their way of expressing them universal?

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What We Feel

Cross-cultural research

More is needed to help us understand how our society affects what we feel

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Society Within Us: The Self and Emotions as Social Control

Are we free?

Expectations of family and friends

Social mirror

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Socialization into Gender 3.4 Discuss how gender messages from the family, peers, and the mass media teach us society’s gender map.

Learning the Gender Map

Gender Messages in the Family

Gender Messages from Peers

Gender Messages in the Mass Media

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Learning the Gender Map

Gender: Attitudes and behaviors expected of us because we are male/female

Gender map/gender socialization

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Gender Messages in the Family (1 of 3)

Parents

Toys and play

Gay and lesbian parents

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Gender Messages in the Family (2 of 3)

It is in the family that we first learn how to do gender, how to match our ideas, attitudes, and behaviors to those expected of us because of our sex. This photo is from Borneo, Malaysia.

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Gender Messages in the Family (3 of 3)

Shkurtan Hasanpapaj, on the right, is a sworn virgin, shown here with her twin sister Sose. The photo was taken in Shkodra, Albania.

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Gender Messages From Peers

Peer groups

Girls reinforce images of appearance and behavior appropriate for females

Boys police one another’s interests and ways of discussing sex and violence

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Gender Messages in the Mass Media (1 of 2)

Television, movies, and cartoons

Video games

Advertising

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Gender Messages in the Mass Media (2 of 2)

Wasting time? Just fun? Improving hand–eye coordination? Parents’ lament? Now so culturally integrated and gaining respect that a university (Robert Morris in Chicago) now calls playing video games a sport and awards a scholarship in video games. The newest position in coaching is e-sport coach.

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Agents of Socialization 3.5 Explain how the family, the neighborhood, religion, day care, school, peer groups, and the workplace are agents of socialization.

The Family

The Neighborhood

Religion

Day Care

The School

Peer Groups

The Workplace

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The Family

Social class and type of work

Social class and play

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The Neighborhood

Poor neighborhoods

Children from these areas fare worse than children from wealthy neighborhoods

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Religion

Foundation of U.S. morality

Specific doctrines, values, and morality

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Day Care

Participating in day care

Differing personalities for children

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The School (1 of 2)

Manifest functions

Latent functions

Hidden curriculum

Corridor curriculum

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The School (2 of 2)

Schools are a primary agent of socialization. One of their functions is to teach children the attitudes and skills they are thought to need as adults.

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Peer Groups (1 of 2)

Peers

Allow children a source of resistance to parental and school socialization

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Peer Groups (2 of 2)

Status insecurity, already high at this time of life, increases with gossip and ridicule.

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The Workplace

Anticipatory socialization

A mental rehearsal for the career

Ongoing socialization

The job becomes a greater part of the self-concept

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Resocialization (1 of 2) 3.6 Explain what total institutions are and how they resocialize people.

Total Institutions

Degradation ceremonies

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Resocialization (2 of 2)

A recruit with a drill instructor.

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Socialization through the Life Course (1 of 6) 3.7 Identify major divisions of the life course, and discuss the sociological significance of the life course.

The Life Course

Childhood (from birth to about age 12)

Adolescence (ages 13-17)

Transitional adulthood (ages 18-29)

The middle years (ages 30-65)

The older years (about age 63 on)

Applying the Sociological Perspective to the Life Course

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Socialization through the Life Course (2 of 6)

Childhood (from birth to about age 12)

Child labor

Terrorizing children

Industrialization

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Socialization through the Life Course (3 of 6)

Adolescence (ages 13-17)

A social invention

Initiation rites

Transitional adulthood (ages 18-29)

Adultolescence

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Figure 3.2 Adulthood: A New Stage in the Life Course

Bar chart showing changes over time in the percentages of those who have reached full adulthood by their 20s and 30s.

Source: Furstenberg et al. 2004. Year 2010 is the author’s estimate based on Sironi and

Fursterberg 2014.

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50

Socialization through the Life Course (4 of 6)

With full adulthood postponed longer and longer, Dad and Mom’s basement will do just fine as a free apartment.

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Socialization through the Life Course (5 of 6)

The Middle Years (ages 30-65)

The Early Middle

The Later Middle

The Older Years (about age 65 on)

The Transitional Older Years

The Later Older Years

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Socialization through the Life Course (6 of 6)

Applying the sociological perspective to the life course

Social location

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Are We Prisoners of Socialization? 3.8 Understand why we are not prisoners of socialization.

We Are NOT Robots

We Are Individuals

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Photo Credits (1 of 2)

Chapter 3 Christopher Corr/Ikon Images/Superstock; 004: Based on Begley 1979; Chen 1979; Wright 1995; Segal and Hershberger 2005 Segal and Mulligan 2014; Woo 2015.; 004: Kingsley Davis, Kingsley Davis: A Biography And Selections From His Writings, Transaction Publishers, 2004.; 006: Skeels, H. M. “Adult Status of Children with Contrasting Early Life Experiences: A Follow-up Study.” Monograph of the Society for Research in Child Development, 31, 3, 1966.; 007: Pines, Maya. “The Civilizing of Genie.” Psychology Today, 15, September 1981:28–34.; 009: Cooley, Charles Horton. Human Nature and the Social Order. New York: Scribner’s, 1902.; 018: Based on Zumbrun 2007; Bilefsky 2008; Paterniti 2014; Mema and Gaudichet 2016.; 019: Eder, Donna. “On Becoming Female: Lessons Learned in School.” In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, 14th ed., James M. Henslin, ed. New York: Free Press, 2007.; 024: Based on Rodriguez, Richard. “The Education of Richard Rodriguez.” Saturday Review, February 8, 1975:147–149; Rodriguez, Richard. Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriguez. Boston: Godine, 1982; Rodriguez, Richard. “The Late Victorians: San Francisco, AIDS, and the Homosexual Stereotype.” Harper’s Magazine, October 1990:57–66; Rodriguez, Richard. “Mixed Blood.” Harper’s Magazine, 283, November 1991:47–56; Rodriguez, Richard. “Searching for Roots in a Changing Society.” In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, 8th ed., James M. Henslin, ed. New York: Free Press, 1995:486–491; Herrera and Rodriguez 2014.; 026: Redacted from Eder, Donna. “Sitting in on Adolescent Conversations.” In Social Problems: A Down-to-Earth Approach, 11th ed., James M. Henslin, ed. Boston: Pearson, 2014.; 028: Based on Garfnkel, Harold. “Conditions of Successful Degradation Ceremonies.” American Journal of Sociology, 61, 2, March 1956:420–424;

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Photo Credits (2 of 2)

Ricks, Thomas E. “‘New’ Marines Illustrate Growing Gap between Military and Society.” Wall Street Journal, July 27, 1995:A1, A4; Goffman, Erving. Asylums: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates. Chicago: Aldine, 1961; Dyer, Gwynne. “Anybody’s Son Will Do.” In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, 14th ed., James M. Henslin, ed. New York: Free Press, 2007.; 030: DeMause, Lloyd. “Our Forebears Made Childhood a Nightmare.” Psychology Today 8, 11, April 1975:85–88.; 031: Based on Furstenberg, Frank F., Jr., Sheela Kennedy, Vonnie C. McLoyd, Ruben G. Rumbaut, and Richard A. Settersten, Jr. “Growing Up Is Harder to Do.” Contexts, 3, 3, Summer 2004:33–41. Year 2010 is the author’s estimate based on Sironi and Furstenberg 2014.; AP Images; Apple Tree House/Iconica/Getty Images; Bernhard Classen/imageBROKER/Newscom; Christopher Corr/Ikon Images/superstock; Dannis Waters/The Palm Beach Post/Zuma Press; Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images; Elice Jacob/Still Pictures/The Image Works; etabeta1/Alamy Stock Photo; Frank and Ernest used with the permission

of the Thaves and the Cartoonist Group. All rights reserved.; Ghislain & Marie David de Lossy/Cultura Creative (RF)/Alamy Stock Photo; Giovanni Zorzi/EyeEm/Getty Images; IS179/Image Source/Alamy Stock Photo; James M Henslin; Jim Damaske/Tampa Bay Times/The Image Works; Jupiterimages/Stockbyte/Getty Images; KK Tan/Shutterstock; Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher/ZUMA Press/Newscom; Michael MacIntyre/Eye Ubiquitous; Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock; Moviestore collection Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo; Nina Leen/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images; Peter Hvizdak/The Image Works; pixelheadphoto digitalskillet/Shutterstock; Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock; SuperStock; Vicky Kasala Productions/Photolibrary/Getty Images

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Copyright

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