Slavery In the Antebellum Period Argumentative Essay Argue what, in your view, is the most important aspect of slavery in this period making some reference

Slavery In the Antebellum Period Argumentative Essay Argue what, in your view, is the most important aspect of slavery in this period making some reference to one or more of the supplemental materials. It can be any aspect you wish (for slaves, for owners, for the American economy, for politics, etc.). Remember this should be a full paragraph response.

ITS A ONE PARAGRAPH ANSWER AND PLEASE USE ONLY THE SOURCES PROVIDED AND MAKE YOUR ARGUMENT BASED ON THE SOURCES BELOW

SOURCES

http://www.balladofamerica.com/music/indexes/songs…

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/who-really-ran-the-underground-railroad/ U.S. HISTORY
Chapter 12 Cotton is King: The Antebellum South, 1800–1860
PowerPoint Image Slideshow
FIGURE 12.1
Bateaux à Vapeur Géant, la Nouvelle-Orléans 1853 (Giant Steamboats at New
Orleans, 1853), by Hippolyte Sebron, shows how New Orleans, at the mouth of the
Mississippi River, was the primary trading hub for the cotton that fueled the growth of
the southern economy.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.2
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.3
In the late nineteenth century, J. N.
Wilson captured this image of harvest
time at a southern plantation. While the
workers in this photograph are not slave
laborers, the process of cotton
harvesting shown here had changed little
from antebellum times.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.4
As in this depiction of the saloon of the Mississippi River steamboat Princess, elegant
and luxurious rooms often occupied the interiors of antebellum steamships, whose
decks were filled with cargo.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.5
This print of The Levee – New Orleans (1884) shows the bustling port of New Orleans
with bales of cotton waiting to be shipped. The sheer volume of cotton indicates its
economic importance throughout the century.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.6
The original caption of this photograph of a slave’s scarred back (a), taken in Baton Rouge, Louisiana,
in 1863, reads as follows: “Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed sore from
the whipping. My master come after I was whipped; he discharged the overseer. The very words of poor
Peter, taken as he sat for his picture.” Images like this one helped bolster the northern abolitionist
message of the inhumanity of slavery. The drawing of an iron mask, collar, leg shackles, and spurs (b)
demonstrates the various cruel and painful instruments used to restrain slaves.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.7
Brer Rabbit, depicted here in an illustration from Uncle Remus, His Songs and His
Sayings: The Folk-Lore of the Old Plantation (1881) by Joel Chandler Harris, was a
trickster who outwitted his opponents.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.8
This version of “Roll, Jordan, Roll” was included in Slave Songs of the United States,
the first published collection of African American music, which appeared in 1867.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.9
In this late eighteenth-century painting, a
free woman of color stands with her
quadroon daughter in New Orleans.
Families with members that had widely
varying ethnic characteristics were not
uncommon at the time, especially in the
larger cities.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.10
In Sale of Estates, Pictures and Slaves in the Rotunda, New Orleans (1853) by J. M.
Starling, it is clear that slaves are considered property to be auctioned off, just like
pictures or other items.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.11
As the wealth of the antebellum South increased, it also became more unequally
distributed, and an ever-smaller percentage of slaveholders held a substantial number
of slaves.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.12
The grand house of Edward Lloyd V advertised the status and wealth of its owner. In its
heyday, the Lloyd family’s plantation boasted holdings of forty-two thousand acres and
one thousand slaves.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.13
In this painting by Felix Octavius Carr Darley, a yeoman farmer carrying a scythe
follows his livestock down the road.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.14
“The Modern Tribunal and Arbiter of
Men’s Differences,” an illustration that
appeared on the cover of The Mascot, a
newspaper published in nineteenthcentury New Orleans, reveals the
importance of dueling in southern culture;
it shows men bowing before an altar on
which are laid a pistol and knife.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.15
This cover illustration from Harper’s
Weekly in 1861 shows the ideal of
southern womanhood.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.16
John C. Calhoun, shown here in a ca.
1845 portrait by George Alexander Healy,
defended states’ rights, especially the
right of the southern states to protect
slavery from a hostile northern majority.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.17
This 1857 illustration by an advocate of polygenism indicates that the “Negro” occupies
a place between the Greeks and chimpanzees. What does this image reveal about the
methods of those who advocated polygenism?
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.18
The “Ostend Doctrine” (1856), by artist Louis Maurer and lithographer Nathaniel
Currier, mocks James Buchanan by depicting him being robbed, just as many
northerners believed slaveholders were attempting to rob Spain. The thugs robbing
Buchanan use specific phrases from the Ostend Manifesto as they relieve him of his
belongings.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.
FIGURE 12.19
Famed Civil War photographer Mathew Brady took this photograph (a) of “General” William
Walker circa 1855–1860. Walker led a filibuster expedition and briefly conquered Nicaragua,
fulfilling a dream of many proexpansionist southern slaveholders. Cornelius Vanderbilt (b), the
shipping tycoon who controlled much of the traffic across Nicaragua between the Atlantic and
the Pacific, clashed with Walker and ultimately supported Costa Rica in its war against him.
This OpenStax ancillary resource is © Rice University under a CC-BY 4.0 International license; it may be reproduced or modified but must be attributed to OpenStax,
Rice University and any changes must be noted. Any images credited to other sources are similarly available for reproduction, but must be attributed to their sources.

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Submit a Comment