Remembered Event Essay

Remembered Event Essay (memoir, autobiographical, or narrative essay) The narrative essay relates a personal story, and it is usually the first essay students write in ENG 111. It follows typical story structure: rising action and building suspense leading to a climax which is followed by a conclusion. The narrative event usually has an implied point. It uses dialogue and description to recreate an event, is told in first person point of view, and shows the event to the reader. Although there are undoubtedly several factors and moments in your remembered event or events, I’m asking you to really focus on one specific instance, and make that instance the main part of your essay. Your memoir must include the following narrative elements: •Scenes full of detail and imagery •Characters with motivation and depth •Incremental, logical development of the plot •Conflict and theme •Significant dialogue •Change in thinking; epiphany •The reader must be led into and out of the story, not necessarily with the traditional single introduction and conclusion paragraphs, but in some effective manner •Reasonably correct spelling, grammar, and mechanics. Your essay must be at least 3 pages (This means at least 3 FULL pages. It can be more than 3 pages if you’d like, but try to keep it under 7 pages) and in MLA format. Pointers: 1) You must narrow your story down to one key event, even if there were several involved in your particular memoir. You won’t have room to cover many events OR a large passage of time, so just focus on one. Everything else can be condensed into the introduction and conclusion. 2) You must use lots of concrete details and specifics. Tell me what people look like, what things smell or taste like, what sounds you’re hearing. You need to make things come alive for me. 3) You must present your event as a story, which features a conflict and a change of heart. In other words, you were one way, and then something happened to make you another. 4) You must use dialogue correctly. Any dialogue used must be significant. A simple: He said, “No.” will not suffice. The dialogue must be important to the story and not obviously thrown in so you could meet this requirement. What I’m not looking for is some big, traumatic experience where your dying uncle charged forward with continuing the family business before succumbing to multiple knife wounds. That’s Hollywood stuff-and pretty cliché Hollywood as well! I’m looking for small and meaningful stories about surprise, not big and important epics! I’ll give you two examples, that could serve as suitable topics: •When I was 20 years old, I had a friend who committed suicide. He was very popular and was friends with all the popular, strong, big, non-emotional guys. At his funeral, I experienced this moment when I saw all of his friends- these big, strong football player types bawling their eyes out, and weak, vulnerable, emotionally cut open. That image stuck with me. It made me realize (this would be the epiphany) that the face you put on for the world to see, isn’t necessarily who you are inside. This story is a single, focused event that took place in a small window of time, and resulted in an epiphany, or change in thinking. •A few years ago, I didn’t get a full-time position at an institution at which I already worked. I found out as I was leaving for the day. Right before I got on the elevator, when I was just starting to tear up a little and get upset, I made a last minute decision to go check my mailbox. In that mailbox was a letter from a student saying that I’d really had a positive impact on his life, that he really missed my classes, and that he appreciated all I had done for him. Immediately I smiled and my heart was warmed. How could I possibly be upset about not being full-time when I knew I was good at what I did, and that I really made a difference in people’s lives? I couldn’t. What’s more important? Getting a job or knowing that you do the best you possibly can at what you do, and you have the opportunity to positively impact lives? (this would be the epiphany- from the moment I smiled down to the end) This too, is a single, focused event that took place in a small window of time, and resulted in an epiphany, or change in thinking. Hopefully, these stories will help you start thinking about all of the tiny, yet highly impactful moments in your own lives. There are also several examples posted on our site that will help you in considering your own topics as well. CAUTION: students can get bogged down in the expected, clichéd details and never find a real “turning point,” which can be defined as a change of heart or epiphany. YOUR ESSAY MUST HAVE A CLEAR TURNING POINT. Any graduation day, for example, can come with cameras flashing, the green football field covered with chairs, or a sea of your school’s colors laid out in the tile of graduation caps. Each and every graduation day features a commencement speaker and a few choice, but almost-always-forgettable remarks from the valedictorian. At the same time, most graduation days are ceremonial and don’t involve a conflict or a change of heart or mind. Most graduation days don’t signal a change in a person, but simply a change in status: no longer a high school student. Another favorite topic with students, “the championship game,” might include a conflict (Will we win?) and suspense, but no particular change of mind or heart for the writer. Students also gravitate to stories about the day a grandparent or pet died. These events are significant because loss and grief are serious emotions, but a change of heart or mind rarely takes place on these days. Although they are on different topics, the essays in the text can help you with the scope and structure of your essay! Essays that do not meet all of the requirements will not receive full points no matter how great the content or writing is. Grading Rubric To receive a passing grade, RE Essays must meet the following requirements outlined in the assignment instructions: •is at least 3 FULL pages in length. Much more than that means you haven’t narrowed down your essay topic enough and you need to do so. You do not increase your chances of getting a better grade by writing more than the assignment requires. In fact, you decrease your chances because it shows you aren’t capable of focusing your material enough or of following directions. If you find you have much more material than an assignment requires, you need to work on your editing. •focuses on ONE, SINGLE event that takes place in a unified, small amount of time. Remember you should write about 1 single event. Usually, you’re safe if you pick something that took place in a small, unified amount of time rather than something that took place over several days, an entire summer, a week, your whole life, etc. Let’s look at an example. Say I went to the beach for a week. During that week, I went swimming on Day 1, went to the outlets on Day 2, went to Medieval Times on Day 3, went to a show at the House of Blues on Day 4, etc…. Writing about each of those events does not constitute a single event. It constitutes up to 7 different events that were a part of something larger. I usually say you don’t want to write about the umbrella event, you want to write about one of the people under it. Make sense? Just focus! (example of single, focused event in next point too.) •contains a significant epiphany or change in thinking, ie: you went from thinking one way to thinking another way. Notice the word “significant”. It doesn’t have to be earth-shattering or traumatic. For example, when I was about 20 years old, a friend of mine committed suicide. That in itself is a huge traumatic event that no doubt did indeed have a huge impact on me and/or cause me to have some sort of huge epiphany; however, something more focused and less traumatic in epiphany was this particular smaller event of the larger event. At the funeral, I saw the now 20 something year old boys I’d known in high school, weep. I saw them fall apart and break onto
each other’s shoulders. Boys that I had known as labels. As football players, jocks, jerks, dates. Those guys who were just too cool for anything. Those guys who had no emotions. Those guys… those guys were now human. They had feelings. They had emotions. They weren’t the same boys I knew in high school. They now knew pain. They knew hurt. In that scene I learned people grew, changed, and weren’t always on the inside, the image they projected to the world on the outside….now I know that does sound kind of dramatic the way I’ve written it, but hey, I’m a writer, that’s what I do. Sorry. Anyway, my point is two fold. First see how I focused on some tiny little event here? Also see how I tied in what I experienced with a change it caused in me? Those are the two main things you want to do with this essay. (Also ignore my liberties with punctuation and sentence structure in my little creative sample there. In intro to writing, you have to follow rules. In creative writing you get to break them.) •contains significant, correctly punctuated dialogue. We’ll talk more about how to punctuate dialogue later on, but at this point just know that the dialogue needs to be significant in content. Your entire essay should not be dialogue, nor should just one tiny bit. You have to strike a good balance and the words that are said need to be chosen for a reason. There are some sample essays that will help you see how to do this. Other general elements for you to keep an eye on in your writing: Ideas: Essay meets assignment specifications (at least 3 full pages, tells a story about a specific event appropriate to the audience and purpose)? Correct topic (see instructions), development (narrative), essay components (title, introduction, body, conclusion)? Demonstrates understanding of corresponding readings? Original, mature subject matter? Story doesn’t wander or get bogged down? Original supporting ideas? Clear thesis/main point/significance? (Note that you might have an implied thesis for this essay). Development makes sense? Supports the thesis? Vivid presentation of people and places? Appropriate use of showing and telling? Strong action verbs? People moving and gesturing? (Your readers should be able to “see” and “hear” people moving around and interacting with each other). Uses plenty of detail, dialogue, and description? Event’s significance is clear? Writer avoids unnecessary self-disclosure? Demonstrates thorough invention and revision based on peer and e-instructor feedback? Structure: Engaging opening—title and hook? Introduction provides background? Forecasts points? Narrative structure? (Rising action, climax/epiphany, falling action)? Conclusion provides closure? Correct paragraphing, especially with dialogue? Not choppy between paragraphs? (Plenty of transitions, time markers, and other coherence devices)? Not choppy within paragraphs? Demonstrates outlining and organizing? Mechanics and Style: Correct words? Mature, precise diction? Active sentences?Concise sentences? Avoids cliché’s? Avoids profanity? Good sentence variety? Sophisticated sentence structures? Correct grammar? Correct spelling? Correct punctuation? Correct capitalization? Dialogue is correctly punctuated? Correct manuscript format–1” margins, Times New Roman font, correct heading, header, and spacing? Demonstrates careful editing and proof reading? Remembered Event Essay (memoir, autobiographical, or narrative essay) The narrative essay relates a personal story, and it is usually the first essay students write in ENG 111. It follows typical story structure: rising action and building suspense leading to a climax which is followed by a conclusion. The narrative event usually has an implied point. It uses dialogue and description to recreate an event, is told in first person point of view, and shows the event to the reader. Although there are undoubtedly several factors and moments in your remembered event or events, I’m asking you to really focus on one specific instance, and make that instance the main part of your essay. Your memoir must include the following narrative elements: •Scenes full of detail and imagery •Characters with motivation and depth •Incremental, logical development of the plot •Conflict and theme •Significant dialogue •Change in thinking; epiphany •The reader must be led into and out of the story, not necessarily with the traditional single introduction and conclusion paragraphs, but in some effective manner •Reasonably correct spelling, grammar, and mechanics. Your essay must be at least 3 pages (This means at least 3 FULL pages. It can be more than 3 pages if you’d like, but try to keep it under 7 pages) and in MLA format. Pointers: 1) You must narrow your story down to one key event, even if there were several involved in your particular memoir. You won’t have room to cover many events OR a large passage of time, so just focus on one. Everything else can be condensed into the introduction and conclusion. 2) You must use lots of concrete details and specifics. Tell me what people look like, what things smell or taste like, what sounds you’re hearing. You need to make things come alive for me. 3) You must present your event as a story, which features a conflict and a change of heart. In other words, you were one way, and then something happened to make you another. 4) You must use dialogue correctly. Any dialogue used must be significant. A simple: He said, “No.” will not suffice. The dialogue must be important to the story and not obviously thrown in so you could meet this requirement. What I’m not looking for is some big, traumatic experience where your dying uncle charged forward with continuing the family business before succumbing to multiple knife wounds. That’s Hollywood stuff-and pretty cliché Hollywood as well! I’m looking for small and meaningful stories about surprise, not big and important epics! I’ll give you two examples, that could serve as suitable topics: •When I was 20 years old, I had a friend who committed suicide. He was very popular and was friends with all the popular, strong, big, non-emotional guys. At his funeral, I experienced this moment when I saw all of his friends- these big, strong football player types bawling their eyes out, and weak, vulnerable, emotionally cut open. That image stuck with me. It made me realize (this would be the epiphany) that the face you put on for the world to see, isn’t necessarily who you are inside. This story is a single, focused event that took place in a small window of time, and resulted in an epiphany, or change in thinking. •A few years ago, I didn’t get a full-time position at an institution at which I already worked. I found out as I was leaving for the day. Right before I got on the elevator, when I was just starting to tear up a little and get upset, I made a last minute decision to go check my mailbox. In that mailbox was a letter from a student saying that I’d really had a positive impact on his life, that he really missed my classes, and that he appreciated all I had done for him. Immediately I smiled and my heart was warmed. How could I possibly be upset about not being full-time when I knew I was good at what I did, and that I really made a difference in people’s lives? I couldn’t. What’s more important? Getting a job or knowing that you do the best you possibly can at what you do, and you have the opportunity to positively impact lives? (this would be the epiphany- from the moment I smiled down to the end) This too, is a single, focused event that took place in a small window of time, and resulted in an epiphany, or change in thinking. Hopefully, these stories will help you start thinking about all of the tiny, yet highly impactful moments in your own lives. There are also several examples posted on our site that will help you in considering your own topics as well. CAUTION: students can get bogged down in the expected, clichéd details and never find a real “turning point,” which can be defined as a change of heart or epiphany. YOUR ESSAY MUST HAVE A CLEAR TURNING POINT. Any graduation day, for example, can come wi
th cameras flashing, the green football field covered with chairs, or a sea of your school’s colors laid out in the tile of graduation caps. Each and every graduation day features a commencement speaker and a few choice, but almost-always-forgettable remarks from the valedictorian. At the same time, most graduation days are ceremonial and don’t involve a conflict or a change of heart or mind. Most graduation days don’t signal a change in a person, but simply a change in status: no longer a high school student. Another favorite topic with students, “the championship game,” might include a conflict (Will we win?) and suspense, but no particular change of mind or heart for the writer. Students also gravitate to stories about the day a grandparent or pet died. These events are significant because loss and grief are serious emotions, but a change of heart or mind rarely takes place on these days. Although they are on different topics, the essays in the text can help you with the scope and structure of your essay! Essays that do not meet all of the requirements will not receive full points no matter how great the content or writing is. Grading Rubric To receive a passing grade, RE Essays must meet the following requirements outlined in the assignment instructions: •is at least 3 FULL pages in length. Much more than that means you haven’t narrowed down your essay topic enough and you need to do so. You do not increase your chances of getting a better grade by writing more than the assignment requires. In fact, you decrease your chances because it shows you aren’t capable of focusing your material enough or of following directions. If you find you have much more material than an assignment requires, you need to work on your editing. •focuses on ONE, SINGLE event that takes place in a unified, small amount of time. Remember you should write about 1 single event. Usually, you’re safe if you pick something that took place in a small, unified amount of time rather than something that took place over several days, an entire summer, a week, your whole life, etc. Let’s look at an example. Say I went to the beach for a week. During that week, I went swimming on Day 1, went to the outlets on Day 2, went to Medieval Times on Day 3, went to a show at the House of Blues on Day 4, etc…. Writing about each of those events does not constitute a single event. It constitutes up to 7 different events that were a part of something larger. I usually say you don’t want to write about the umbrella event, you want to write about one of the people under it. Make sense? Just focus! (example of single, focused event in next point too.) •contains a significant epiphany or change in thinking, ie: you went from thinking one way to thinking another way. Notice the word “significant”. It doesn’t have to be earth-shattering or traumatic. For example, when I was about 20 years old, a friend of mine committed suicide. That in itself is a huge traumatic event that no doubt did indeed have a huge impact on me and/or cause me to have some sort of huge epiphany; however, something more focused and less traumatic in epiphany was this particular smaller event of the larger event. At the funeral, I saw the now 20 something year old boys I’d known in high school, weep. I saw them fall apart and break onto each other’s shoulders. Boys that I had known as labels. As football players, jocks, jerks, dates. Those guys who were just too cool for anything. Those guys who had no emotions. Those guys… those guys were now human. They had feelings. They had emotions. They weren’t the same boys I knew in high school. They now knew pain. They knew hurt. In that scene I learned people grew, changed, and weren’t always on the inside, the image they projected to the world on the outside….now I know that does sound kind of dramatic the way I’ve written it, but hey, I’m a writer, that’s what I do. Sorry. Anyway, my point is two fold. First see how I focused on some tiny little event here? Also see how I tied in what I experienced with a change it caused in me? Those are the two main things you want to do with this essay. (Also ignore my liberties with punctuation and sentence structure in my little creative sample there. In intro to writing, you have to follow rules. In creative writing you get to break them.) •contains significant, correctly punctuated dialogue. We’ll talk more about how to punctuate dialogue later on, but at this point just know that the dialogue needs to be significant in content. Your entire essay should not be dialogue, nor should just one tiny bit. You have to strike a good balance and the words that are said need to be chosen for a reason. There are some sample essays that will help you see how to do this. Other general elements for you to keep an eye on in your writing: Ideas: Essay meets assignment specifications (at least 3 full pages, tells a story about a specific event appropriate to the audience and purpose)? Correct topic (see instructions), development (narrative), essay components (title, introduction, body, conclusion)? Demonstrates understanding of corresponding readings? Original, mature subject matter? Story doesn’t wander or get bogged down? Original supporting ideas? Clear thesis/main point/significance? (Note that you might have an implied thesis for this essay). Development makes sense? Supports the thesis? Vivid presentation of people and places? Appropriate use of showing and telling? Strong action verbs? People moving and gesturing? (Your readers should be able to “see” and “hear” people moving around and interacting with each other). Uses plenty of detail, dialogue, and description? Event’s significance is clear? Writer avoids unnecessary self-disclosure? Demonstrates thorough invention and revision based on peer and e-instructor feedback? Structure: Engaging opening—title and hook? Introduction provides background? Forecasts points? Narrative structure? (Rising action, climax/epiphany, falling action)? Conclusion provides closure? Correct paragraphing, especially with dialogue? Not choppy between paragraphs? (Plenty of transitions, time markers, and other coherence devices)? Not choppy within paragraphs? Demonstrates outlining and organizing? Mechanics and Style: Correct words? Mature, precise diction? Active sentences?Concise sentences? Avoids cliché’s? Avoids profanity? Good sentence variety? Sophisticated sentence structures? Correct grammar? Correct spelling? Correct punctuation? Correct capitalization? Dialogue is correctly punctuated? Correct manuscript format–1” margins, Times New Roman font, correct heading, header, and spacing? Demonstrates careful editing and proof reading? Remembered Event Essay (memoir, autobiographical, or narrative essay) The narrative essay relates a personal story, and it is usually the first essay students write in ENG 111. It follows typical story structure: rising action and building suspense leading to a climax which is followed by a conclusion. The narrative event usually has an implied point. It uses dialogue and description to recreate an event, is told in first person point of view, and shows the event to the reader. Although there are undoubtedly several factors and moments in your remembered event or events, I’m asking you to really focus on one specific instance, and make that instance the main part of your essay. Your memoir must include the following narrative elements: •Scenes full of detail and imagery •Characters with motivation and depth •Incremental, logical development of the plot •Conflict and theme •Significant dialogue •Change in thinking; epiphany •The reader must be led into and out of the story, not necessarily with the traditional single introduction and conclusion paragraphs, but in some effective manner •Reasonably correct spelling, grammar, and mechanics. Your essay must be at least 3 pages (This means at least 3 FULL pages. It can be more than 3 pages if you’d like, but try to keep it under 7 pages) and in MLA format. Pointers: 1) You must narrow your story down to one key event, even if there were several involved in your particular memoir. Y
ou won’t have room to cover many events OR a large passage of time, so just focus on one. Everything else can be condensed into the introduction and conclusion. 2) You must use lots of concrete details and specifics. Tell me what people look like, what things smell or taste like, what sounds you’re hearing. You need to make things come alive for me. 3) You must present your event as a story, which features a conflict and a change of heart. In other words, you were one way, and then something happened to make you another. 4) You must use dialogue correctly. Any dialogue used must be significant. A simple: He said, “No.” will not suffice. The dialogue must be important to the story and not obviously thrown in so you could meet this requirement. What I’m not looking for is some big, traumatic experience where your dying uncle charged forward with continuing the family business before succumbing to multiple knife wounds. That’s Hollywood stuff-and pretty cliché Hollywood as well! I’m looking for small and meaningful stories about surprise, not big and important epics! I’ll give you two examples, that could serve as suitable topics: •When I was 20 years old, I had a friend who committed suicide. He was very popular and was friends with all the popular, strong, big, non-emotional guys. At his funeral, I experienced this moment when I saw all of his friends- these big, strong football player types bawling their eyes out, and weak, vulnerable, emotionally cut open. That image stuck with me. It made me realize (this would be the epiphany) that the face you put on for the world to see, isn’t necessarily who you are inside. This story is a single, focused event that took place in a small window of time, and resulted in an epiphany, or change in thinking. •A few years ago, I didn’t get a full-time position at an institution at which I already worked. I found out as I was leaving for the day. Right before I got on the elevator, when I was just starting to tear up a little and get upset, I made a last minute decision to go check my mailbox. In that mailbox was a letter from a student saying that I’d really had a positive impact on his life, that he really missed my classes, and that he appreciated all I had done for him. Immediately I smiled and my heart was warmed. How could I possibly be upset about not being full-time when I knew I was good at what I did, and that I really made a difference in people’s lives? I couldn’t. What’s more important? Getting a job or knowing that you do the best you possibly can at what you do, and you have the opportunity to positively impact lives? (this would be the epiphany- from the moment I smiled down to the end) This too, is a single, focused event that took place in a small window of time, and resulted in an epiphany, or change in thinking. Hopefully, these stories will help you start thinking about all of the tiny, yet highly impactful moments in your own lives. There are also several examples posted on our site that will help you in considering your own topics as well. CAUTION: students can get bogged down in the expected, clichéd details and never find a real “turning point,” which can be defined as a change of heart or epiphany. YOUR ESSAY MUST HAVE A CLEAR TURNING POINT. Any graduation day, for example, can come with cameras flashing, the green football field covered with chairs, or a sea of your school’s colors laid out in the tile of graduation caps. Each and every graduation day features a commencement speaker and a few choice, but almost-always-forgettable remarks from the valedictorian. At the same time, most graduation days are ceremonial and don’t involve a conflict or a change of heart or mind. Most graduation days don’t signal a change in a person, but simply a change in status: no longer a high school student. Another favorite topic with students, “the championship game,” might include a conflict (Will we win?) and suspense, but no particular change of mind or heart for the writer. Students also gravitate to stories about the day a grandparent or pet died. These events are significant because loss and grief are serious emotions, but a change of heart or mind rarely takes place on these days. Although they are on different topics, the essays in the text can help you with the scope and structure of your essay! Essays that do not meet all of the requirements will not receive full points no matter how great the content or writing is. Grading Rubric To receive a passing grade, RE Essays must meet the following requirements outlined in the assignment instructions: •is at least 3 FULL pages in length. Much more than that means you haven’t narrowed down your essay topic enough and you need to do so. You do not increase your chances of getting a better grade by writing more than the assignment requires. In fact, you decrease your chances because it shows you aren’t capable of focusing your material enough or of following directions. If you find you have much more material than an assignment requires, you need to work on your editing. •focuses on ONE, SINGLE event that takes place in a unified, small amount of time. Remember you should write about 1 single event. Usually, you’re safe if you pick something that took place in a small, unified amount of time rather than something that took place over several days, an entire summer, a week, your whole life, etc. Let’s look at an example. Say I went to the beach for a week. During that week, I went swimming on Day 1, went to the outlets on Day 2, went to Medieval Times on Day 3, went to a show at the House of Blues on Day 4, etc…. Writing about each of those events does not constitute a single event. It constitutes up to 7 different events that were a part of something larger. I usually say you don’t want to write about the umbrella event, you want to write about one of the people under it. Make sense? Just focus! (example of single, focused event in next point too.) •contains a significant epiphany or change in thinking, ie: you went from thinking one way to thinking another way. Notice the word “significant”. It doesn’t have to be earth-shattering or traumatic. For example, when I was about 20 years old, a friend of mine committed suicide. That in itself is a huge traumatic event that no doubt did indeed have a huge impact on me and/or cause me to have some sort of huge epiphany; however, something more focused and less traumatic in epiphany was this particular smaller event of the larger event. At the funeral, I saw the now 20 something year old boys I’d known in high school, weep. I saw them fall apart and break onto each other’s shoulders. Boys that I had known as labels. As football players, jocks, jerks, dates. Those guys who were just too cool for anything. Those guys who had no emotions. Those guys… those guys were now human. They had feelings. They had emotions. They weren’t the same boys I knew in high school. They now knew pain. They knew hurt. In that scene I learned people grew, changed, and weren’t always on the inside, the image they projected to the world on the outside….now I know that does sound kind of dramatic the way I’ve written it, but hey, I’m a writer, that’s what I do. Sorry. Anyway, my point is two fold. First see how I focused on some tiny little event here? Also see how I tied in what I experienced with a change it caused in me? Those are the two main things you want to do with this essay. (Also ignore my liberties with punctuation and sentence structure in my little creative sample there. In intro to writing, you have to follow rules. In creative writing you get to break them.) •contains significant, correctly punctuated dialogue. We’ll talk more about how to punctuate dialogue later on, but at this point just know that the dialogue needs to be significant in content. Your entire essay should not be dialogue, nor should just one tiny bit. You have to strike a good balance and the words that are said need to be chosen for a reason. There are some sample essays that will help you see how to do this. Other general elements for you to keep an eye on in your writing: Ideas: Essay me
ets assignment specifications (at least 3 full pages, tells a story about a specific event appropriate to the audience and purpose)? Correct topic (see instructions), development (narrative), essay components (title, introduction, body, conclusion)? Demonstrates understanding of corresponding readings? Original, mature subject matter? Story doesn’t wander or get bogged down? Original supporting ideas? Clear thesis/main point/significance? (Note that you might have an implied thesis for this essay). Development makes sense? Supports the thesis? Vivid presentation of people and places? Appropriate use of showing and telling? Strong action verbs? People moving and gesturing? (Your readers should be able to “see” and “hear” people moving around and interacting with each other). Uses plenty of detail, dialogue, and description? Event’s significance is clear? Writer avoids unnecessary self-disclosure? Demonstrates thorough invention and revision based on peer and e-instructor feedback? Structure: Engaging opening—title and hook? Introduction provides background? Forecasts points? Narrative structure? (Rising action, climax/epiphany, falling action)? Conclusion provides closure? Correct paragraphing, especially with dialogue? Not choppy between paragraphs? (Plenty of transitions, time markers, and other coherence devices)? Not choppy within paragraphs? Demonstrates outlining and organizing? Mechanics and Style: Correct words? Mature, precise diction? Active sentences?Concise sentences? Avoids cliché’s? Avoids profanity? Good sentence variety? Sophisticated sentence structures? Correct grammar? Correct spelling? Correct punctuation? Correct capitalization? Dialogue is correctly punctuated? Correct manuscript format–1” margins, Times New Roman font, correct heading, header, and spacing? Demonstrates careful editing and proof reading?