PHYSICS 182A 195L SDSU Simple Pendulum Lab 10 Report I am confused on how to answer the questions in this lab. The data is provided in blue. PHYSICS 182A/1

PHYSICS 182A 195L SDSU Simple Pendulum Lab 10 Report I am confused on how to answer the questions in this lab. The data is provided in blue. PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
Lab 10: Simple Pendulum
San Diego State University
Department of Physics
Physics 182A/195L
TA:
Lab partner 1:
Lab partner 2:
Date: 04/21/2020
Score:
Data has been entered in blue.
Theory
Oscillations can occur whenever a system is pulled away from a stable equilibrium. For
example, Hooke’s law
describes a spring system with an equilibrium at
.A
spring will oscillate if you pull it away from that equilibrium and then release it. In this lab we will
investigate the oscillations of the simple pendulum system: a mass
hangs from a fixed point
by a string of length and negligible mass. We will see that this system exhibits ​simple
harmonic motion,​ a kind of oscillation that can be described by a simple sine or cosine function.
1​ ​Department of Physics | ​O. Gorton and K. Graves
PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
Force diagram
To figure out how to describe this motion, we start by writing down the forces acting on the
pendulum mass
. Looking at the free-body diagram above, we can see that there are two
forces acting on the mass: there is gravity pulling downward on the mass with a force
(mg in the negative y-direction), and there is the force of the pendulum arm
creating a tension
keeping the mass a fixed length from the pivot.
Newton’s second law for this system reads
, a vector equation. Let’s decompose
each vector into its components parallel to and perpendicular to the direction of the pendulum
arm. Along the direction parallel to the pendulum arm:
The cosine function comes from the fact that the gravitational force is shifted degrees away
from being parallel to the pendulum arm. Something convenient happens here: since we know
the length of the pendulum arm will not change, we can safely assume that the tension in the
string and the force
will cancel, leaving
Along the direction perpendicular to the pendulum arm, or in other words, along the direction of
motion:
Again, the sine function appears here due to the right-triangle geometry depicted above. Since
only
is non-zero, we will just call it ‘a’ from here on.
The position equation
We will briefly describe some math that you may have seen in your more advanced calculus
courses. If you don’t want to see any calculus, skip ahead to the calculus free conclusion.
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PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
The equation of motion above is really a differential equation for the displacement
pendulum mass:
of the
This says that the second derivative of
is related to
. In general, this is a
difficult equation to solve. In fact, it can’t be solved with normal calculus methods. We can solve
this equation with an approximation​. ​We will apply the ​small angle approximation​, which says
that as long as the angle
is small,
.
By applying this small angle approximation, our equation for
becomes much simpler:
.
This will make more sense if we replace with something that depends on x and t. If we
remember from geometry that arc length is related to the radius and angle, we can see for this
situation that:
If we plug this into the equation above:
Notice that this looks a lot like Hooke’s law! The force (ma) is equal to a negative constant times
displacement:
​. A function that satisfies this equation is
Calculus free conclusion:​ a simple pendulum will oscillate in a way according to a sine
function, as long as the angle it swings to is small.
Period of motion
There’s more that we can learn given the boxed equation for x(t). One question we might like to
answer is: how long will it take the pendulum to swing back and forth? In other words, what is
the period of the motion? Recalling our knowledge of sine waves, we know that they repeat
every
radians, and if we write the sine wave in the form:
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PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
Then we can identify the constant
as the period of the motion. If we set these two forms of
equal to each other:
,
We can recognize that
The period of motion T (the time it takes to complete one cycle of oscillation) of a simple
pendulum is given by:
Procedure
In this procedure we will measure the period of motion of a simple pendulum. We will try to
answer questions about the period T, to see how it is affected by different properties of the
pendulum system such as the length of the pendulum arm L, the mass of the pendulum bob m,
the acceleration due to gravity g, and the amplitude of the motion A. You can probably guess
from the equation for T which of these will have an impact and which will not.
Setup
1. Run the string through the hole in the brass cylinder and put the ends of the string on the
inner and outer clips of the clamp (​Figure 1​), so the string forms a ’V’ shape as it hangs.
Figure 1: Pull the string between the inner and outer clips of the ramp
2. Adjust the string so the vertical distance from the bottom edge of the Pendulum Clamp
the middle of the pendulum bob is 0.70 m.
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PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
3. Position the Motion Sensor in front of the pendulum so the brass colored disk is vertical
and facing the bob, aimed along the direction that the pendulum will swing (​Figure 2​).
4. Make sure that the range switch on the Motion Sensor is positioned on top. Adjust the
Motion Sensor up or down so that it is at the same height as the pendulum bob.
5. Adjust the position of the Rod Base so that the Motion Sensor is 0.25 m from the
pendulum bob.
Figure 2: Suspend the bob in a “V” shape, with the motion sensor facing the bob.
Measuring the Period
There are three methods available for measuring the period of motion. Ask your TA which
method or methods to use.
Method 1:​ The most straightforward way to measure the period of oscillation is to set the
pendulum into motion and to simply time N complete cycles. If the pendulum swings
back and forth, returning to its original position N times in t seconds, then the period is
. ​It’s important to choose N>10 so that random errors from the timing method
will average out​.
The other two methods use PASCO Capstone™ software to find your period. Start by recording
trials of your oscillations:
● Click on Record to start recording data, data should appear on the graph. After 15
seconds, stop recording. Make sure the amplitude of the swing is relatively small (such
as 0.05 m). If readings are not being recorded, make sure the objects are more than
0.15 m away from the sensor.
● If the resulting data is not a smooth sine curve, you can try changing the position of the
range switch on top of the Motion Sensor. In general, the position with the cart icon is for
smaller, closer objects and the position with the person icon is for larger objects further
away. You should position the switch for whichever works the best.
● Select the rate that data is recorded by changing the frequency of the motion sensor at
the bottom of the screen. Make sure there are enough points to create a smooth sine
wave. A rate of 50 Hz will work well for this experiment.
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PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
Once these steps have been performed, you can find your period with one of the two following
methods:
Method 2:​ PASCO Capstone™ can find the period using a recording of the position
versus time of the pendulum bob. Begin by using the Coordinates Tool (from the Graph
Tool palette), select a peak in your data recovered from oscillating a pendulum. Right
click on the graph box and select Show Delta. Find an adjacent peak where ∆x ~ 0m to
view the period.
Method 3:​ Another method involves using various Curve Fit functions available. Select
the Sine Fit from the Graph Tool palette. The general form of the sine wave is:
, where T is the period. The values from your Curve Fit can be used to
calculate the period of the oscillation. (Note: ω in the Sine Fit option is equal to 2π/T).
Part A: Period of Oscillation as a Function of Length
We will test how changing L, the length of the pendulum, affects the period of motion.
1. Adjust the length of the pendulum to be 0.7 meters by lengthening or shortening the
string. Measure from the bottom edge of the pendulum clamp down to the middle of the
cylinder.
2. Pull the pendulum bob about 0.05 m away from equilibrium and then release. Allow the
bob to oscillate for a few seconds until the oscillations are smooth.
3. Measure the period of oscillation using the methods from ​Measuring the Period​.
4. Record your measured period in Table A.1.
5. Stop the pendulum from swinging and then shorten the pendulum length by 0.05 m.
6. Repeat steps 2-5, recording data until you have a range of lengths from 0.70 m to 0.15
m according to Table A.1.
Part B: Period of Oscillation as a Function of Amplitude
1. Keep the pendulum length fixed at 0.35 m from the bottom of the clamp to the middle of
the bob (last length used from​ Part A​).
2. Pull the pendulum bob about 0.10 m away from equilibrium and then release. Allow the
bob to oscillate for a few seconds until the oscillations are smooth.
3. Measure the period of oscillation using the methods from ​Measuring the Period​.
4. Record the measured period in Table B.1.
5. Stop the pendulum from swinging.
6. Repeat steps 2-5 for amplitudes of 0.09 m, 0.08 m, 0.07 m, 0.06 m and 0.05 m,
recording each measured period in Table B.1.
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PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
Part C: Period of Oscillation as a Function of Mass
1. Remove the brass cylinder from the pendulum and measure the mass of the brass,
aluminum, and plastic cylinders. Record these values in Table C.1.
2. Reattach the brass cylinder to the pendulum system.
3. Adjust the length of the pendulum so that the distance from the bottom edge of the
pendulum clamp to the middle of the cylinder is 0.60 m.
4. Pull the pendulum bob about 0.06 m away from equilibrium and then release. Allow the
bob to oscillate for a few seconds until the oscillations are smooth.
5. Measure the period using one of the methods from the ​Measuring the Period​.
6. Record the measured period in Table C.1.
7. Stop the pendulum from swinging.
8. Repeat steps 3-6 for both the aluminum and plastic cylinder. Make sure to keep the
length of the pendulum, and the maximum amplitude, the same.
Data
Table A.1: Period and Varying Length
Length (m)
Cycles observed
Time, if using Method 1 (s)
0.70
15
25.16
0.65
15
24.25
0.55
15
22.30
0.45
15
20.18
0.35
15
17.80
0.25
15
15.05
0.20
15
13.45
0.15
15
11.65
Period (s)
Table B.1: Period and Varying Amplitude
Amplitude (m)
Cycles observed
Time, if using Method 1 (1)
0.10
14
16.09
7 Department of Physics
Period (s)
PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
0.09
14
16.60
0.08
14
16.65
0.07
14
16.59
0.06
14
16.60
0.05

14
16.65
Table C.1: Period and Varying Mass
Bob (type)
Bob Mass (kg)
Cycles
observed
Time, if using
Method 1 (s)
Brass
0.0873
15
15.50
Aluminum
0.0270
15
15.40
Plastic
0.0120
15
15.45
Period (s)
Analysis
Part A: Period of Oscillation as a Function of Length
1. What happens to the period as you adjust the length of the pendulum?
2. We can solve for g, the acceleration due to gravity, using the length and period.
Beginning from the equation of motion found in the ​Theory ​section, we can solve for g:
Find the value of g for each of the lengths, using Table A.1 as reference:
Length (m)
g (m/s​2​)
0.70
0.65
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PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
0.55
0.45
0.35
0.25
0.20
0.15
3. Do your values for g change significantly for different values of the pendulum length?
Does this make sense? Why or why not?
Part B: Period of Oscillation as a Function of Amplitude
What happens to the period as you adjust the amplitude of the pendulum?
Part C: Period of Oscillation as a Function of Mass
1. What happens to the period as you adjust the mass of the pendulum?
2. The amplitude of a pendulum’s oscillation is usually measured by the angle through
which it swings, not its horizontal displacement. In ​Part C​ the length of the pendulum
was about 60 cm and the maximum amplitude was about 6cm. Using right-triangle
trigonometry, calculate the angle of the amplitude. Show your work.
5.74 deg
3. The period of a pendulum is independent of amplitude only if the angle is small
(remember the small angle approximation we made?). Was this the case?
Conclusion
Which variables (g, L, m, A) affect the period of motion T of the simple pendulum, and which do
not?
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PHYSICS 182A/195L LAB REPORT – LAB 10: Simple Pendulum
Questions
1. Must a spring obey Hooke’s Law in order to oscillate? Explain why or why not.
2. When a body is oscillating in simple harmonic motion, is its acceleration zero at any
point? If so, where and why?
3. You are trying to build a metronome (a time keeping device) using a simple pendulum.
Assume that your pendulum bob weighs 1 kg and g=9.8m/s​2​. How long should you make
the pendulum arm so that the metronome ticks with a frequency of 100 BPM (beats per
minute)? (Hint: frequency = 1/T.) Show your work.
4. What is the frequency of a pendulum whose normal period is T when it is in an elevator
in free fall? (Hint: what is the apparent value of g in this situation?)
5. We usually assume that the mass of the pendulum arm is negligible compared to the
mass hung from it. But if not negligible, does the mass of the string increase or decrease
the period of motion?
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