MGMT603 Please Follow directions or I will dispute! READ ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ATTACHMENT FOR ASSIGNMENT  BELOW! Will be checked thoroughly for plagiari

MGMT603 Please Follow directions or I will dispute!

READ ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ATTACHMENT FOR ASSIGNMENT  BELOW!

Will be checked thoroughly for plagiarism!

Assignment Details

Your final research paper will be based on a topic of your choice. 

LEWIS CHANGE MODEL

You may use some of the readings assigned in the class and expand on a particular topic.

In order to complete this task, you will need to write the first half of your final paper. To be successful, a minimum of five (5) pages of substantive content toward your final paper must be submitted in APA format 

Grading Criteria:
Please ensure that you review the grading criteria for this assignment carefully, to ensure that you receive the highest possible grade for your work! Read the instructions in detail before beginning this assignment. Please ask questions if necessary.

TurnitIn Information: Your paper will automatically be submitted to TurnitIn when you submit your paper through the “Assignment” section of the classroom. As a guide, the similarity score is the percentage of an assessment which directly quotes other sources, and should be no more than 10%. Please note that this refers only to direct quotes within the body of the text and does not include the reference list or cover sheet. Anything more than 10% will be subject to evaluation and loss of points if plagiarism is detected. ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 1

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 3

Annotated Bibliography: Lewin’s Change Theory

Name
Institution

Alicia Kritsonis. (2005). Comparison of Change Theories. International Journal Of Management, Business, And Administration Volume 8, Number 1.
The article by Alicia offers a comparison of various change theories. The change theories include; Lewin’s three-step change model, Lippitt’s phases of change theory, Prochaska and DiClemente’s change theory, social cognitive theory, and the theory of reasoned action and planned behavior. Alicia compares and contrasts the different theories highlighting the differences. The article is excellent for those seeking to understand the different change theories. The different change theories are clearly defined with their assumptions shown.
The article is rich in information about the different change theories. The focus is on Lewin’s three-step change model, Lippitt’s phases of change theory, Prochaska and DiClemente’s change theory, and social cognitive theory. The article shows the assumptions of the theories, which make them different from each other. The nature of change at the organization determines the type of theory that the organization can apply. Alicia can show this by giving the different characteristics of the change theories. In her experience, the author also shows how change can facilitate long-term success at the organization. The article can be of great use for scholars and students trying to understand the different change theories.
Burnes, B. (2020). The Origins of Lewin’s Three-Step Model of Change. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 56(1), 32–59. https://doi.org/10.1177/0021886319892685
Burn’s, looks at the earlier articles by Lewin. These articles were fundamental in the development of the three-stage change model. The article looks at the history of Lewin’s three-stage change model. The article also looks at the criticism labeled at the model, like those suggesting that Lewin never developed the model. However, Lewin’s articles in the 40′ suggest that he developed the two stages of the model. The Freezing and unfreezing stages were in Lewin’s articles in the ’40s and were fundamental in developing the model.
The article is well written, answering some of the critics labeled at Lewin. Burns is able to provide the evidence labeled against Lewin in the development of the model. The article also addresses the gap in Lewin’s literature. Students would benefit from the article, which is rich in information as Burns answers most of the criticism labeled against Lewin.
Edgar S. (1996).Kurt Lewin’s Change Theory in the Field and the Classroom: Notes Toward a Model of Managed Learning. Systems Practice; 9 no. 1 (1996): 27–47
Edgar expands on Lewin’s three-step change model. Most studies have concentrated on the three stages of the model and how they can be applied in organizations, the author further looks at what influenced Lewin. Lewin’s three-step change model has been described as the most used change model, and an understanding of what influenced Lewin is necessary for the management. Organizational change is an essential process for the organization and picking the suitable change model requires a deeper understanding of the model. The author also looks at different aspects of change, like the management of planned change.
Hussain, Syed & SHEN, Lei & Akram, Tayyaba & Haider, Muhammad & Hussain, Syed & Ali, Muhammad. (2016). Kurt Lewin’s process model for organizational change: The role of leadership and employee involvement: A critical review. Journal of Innovation & Knowledge. 10.1016/j.jik.2016.07.002.
The authors of this article were successful in their study of crafting the relation between process model and change. The focus is on Lewin’s three-step change model with various aspects being used in the study. The study looks at how Lewin’s model is able to granulate change, the importance of knowledge sharing in the change process, and how leadership style will affect the change. Most studies have linked leadership style to the success of the change process. This study looks at Lewin’s model and leadership and is able to determine that the leadership style is essential in ensuring change.
On knowledge sharing ad Lewin’s model, the study showed the importance of information flowing from the top to the bottom. Knowledgeable people at the organization are able to share skills, experiences, and competencies. The knowledge is crucial during the change stage of Lewin’s change model. The change stage is the implementation stage of the change, and the employees are able to apply the knowledge and skills gained to ensure the success of the process. The study also explains why organizations may use different change models to remain competitive in the market.
June Kaminski. (2011). Theory applied to informatics – Lewin’s Change Theory. CJNI Journal. http://cjni.net/Journal_original/Winter2011/cjni.net-_Theory_applied_to_informatics_%96_Lewin%92s_Change_Theory___CJNI_Journal_.pdf
The journal offers an in-depth analysis of Lewin’s change theory. It begins by defining the three stages of Lewin’s change theory: unfreezing stage, change, and freezing. June can highlight the importance of each stage by clearly defining the stage and offering its application in an organizational setting. Take, for instance, the change stage; the stage involves the changes taking place at the organization. The employees support the changes after they have been motivated to participate in the change. The implementation of the change has to be supported by the employees for the change to be successful.
June goes a step from Lewin’s change theory to show an extension of the theory. The force field analysis offers direction for diagnosing situations and managing change. This is shown through diagrams that explain the reasoning behind force field analysis. Lewin’s change theory analysis extends to other aspects like driving forces, restraining forces, and equilibrium. These additional aspects of the theory make it easier to understand and apply Lewin’s change theory. Users of the journal would benefit from the extension of the theory.
Stephen, Cummings, Todd Bridgman, and Kenneth G Brown. (2016). Unfreezing change as three steps: Rethinking Kurt Lewin’s legacy for change management. Human relations 2016, Vol. 69(1) 33–60
Lewin’s three-stage change model is considered the fundamental approach to managing change. However, critics have criticized Lewin for oversimplifying the change process. The authors of the article look at why the model is considered the fundamental approach to managing change. The authors look at the dubious assumptions by students of change management and management. They consider the three stages as being the greatest invention of Lewin for the model. The authors are able to dig into the early writings of Lewin, where they ascertained the three-stage approach to change management. An articles review was able to show the various criticisms from different authors on the model.
The authors look at the history of changing in three steps (CATS). The three-step approach was relatively unknown before the ’80s as people relied on the two stages introduced by Lewin in the 1940s. The two stages of unfreezing the old behavior ad freezing the new behavior have been influential ever since the ’40s. The article answers most of the criticism labeled at Lewin’s model and considers the model one of the best in managing change. Students of change management and management would benefit from the article review. The article is rich in detail about Lewin’s three stages change model.

References
Alicia Kritsonis. (2005). Comparison of Change Theories. International Journal Of Management, Business, And Administration Volume 8, Number 1.
Burnes, B. (2020). The Origins of Lewin’s Three-Step Model of Change. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 56(1), 32–59. https://doi.org/10.1177/0021886319892685
Edgar S. (1996).Kurt Lewin’s Change Theory in the Field and in the Classroom: Notes Toward a Model of Managed Learning. Systems Practice; 9 no. 1 (1996): 27–47
Hussain, Syed & SHEN, Lei & Akram, Tayyaba & Haider, Muhammad & Hussain, Syed & Ali, Muhammad. (2016). Kurt Lewin’s process model for organizational change: The role of leadership and employee involvement: A critical review. Journal of Innovation & Knowledge. 10.1016/j.jik.2016.07.002.
June Kaminski. (2011). Theory applied to informatics – Lewin’s Change Theory. CJNI Journal. http://cjni.net/Journal_original/Winter2011/cjni.net-_Theory_applied_to_informatics_%96_Lewin%92s_Change_Theory___CJNI_Journal_.pdf
Stephen Cummings., Todd Bridgman, and Kenneth G Brown. (2016). Unfreezing change as three steps: Rethinking Kurt Lewin’s legacy for change management. Human relations 2016, Vol. 69(1) 33–60

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