excercise science For the first part of this assignment, you will choose a concept from the textbook that you find particularly interesting. Answer the fol

excercise science For the first part of this assignment, you will choose a concept from the textbook that you find particularly interesting. Answer the following questions on a separate typed paper to be uploaded to Blackboard  (300-500 words, Double-spaced, Times New Roman, size 12 font):

Describe which concept you chose to work on. Make sure to include what this concept entails. Do this in your own words and do not copy phrases from the textbook.
Explain why you chose that concept.
How are you going to apply or adopt that concept into your current lifestyle throughout the semester?
What results do you expect to see from applying this concept into your life?
Include the word count at the end of the page.

During the semester, your interests may change and you can feel free to change the concept you are focused on. This can be discussed in the reflection paper. cor23488_fm_i-xxii.indd i 07/30/15 02:24 PM

ELEVENTH EDITION

Charles B. Corbin

Arizona State University

Gregory J. Welk

Iowa State University

William R. Corbin

Arizona State University

Karen A. Welk

Mary Greeley Medical Center, Ames, Iowa

Concepts of
Fitness & Wellness
A Comprehensive Lifestyle Approach

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CONCEPTS OF FITNESS AND WELLNESS: A COMPREHENSIVE LIFESTYLE APPROACH,
ELEVENTH EDITION
Published by McGraw-Hill, a business unit of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 1221 Avenue of the
Americas, New York, NY, 10020. Copyright © 2016 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America. Previous editions © 2013, 2011, 2009. No part of this publication may
be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without
the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., including, but not limited to, in any network or
other electronic storage or transmission, or broadcast for distance learning.

Some ancillaries, including electronic and print components, may not be available to customers outside the
United States.

This book is printed on acid-free paper.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 RMN/RMN 1 0 9 8 7 6

ISBN 978-007-352348-4
MHID 0-07-352348-8

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Printer: R.R. Donnelley Menasha

All credits appearing at the end of the book are considered to be an extension of the copyright page.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Concepts of fitness & wellness : a comprehensive lifestyle approach/Charles B. Corbin, Arizona State
University, Gregory J. Welk, Iowa State University, William R. Corbin, Arizona State University, Karen A.
Welk, Mary Greeley Medical Center, Ames, Iowa. — Eleventh edition.
pages cm
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-07-352348-4 (acid-free paper)
1. Physical fitness. 2. Exercise. 3. Health. I. Corbin, Charles B. II. Title: Concepts of fitness and wellness.
RA781.C644 2015
613.7—dc23
2015024375
The Internet addresses listed in the text were accurate at the time of publication. The inclusion of a website does
not indicate an endorsement by the authors or McGraw-Hill, and McGraw-Hill does not guarantee the accuracy
of the information presented at these sites.

www.mhhe.com

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15 Nutrition 307

16 Managing Diet and Activity for Healthy Body
Fatness 331

Section I

Lifestyles for Health, Wellness,
and Fitness 1

1 Health, Wellness, Fitness, and Healthy Lifestyles:
An Introduction 1

2 Determinants of Lifelong Health, Wellness,
and Fitness 15

3 Self-Management and Self-Planning Skills for
Health Behavior Change 27

Brief Contents

Section II

An Introduction to Physical Activity 45

4 Preparing for Physical Activity 45

5 The Health Benefits of Physical Activity 65

6 How Much Physical Activity Is Enough? 83

Section III

The Physical Activity Pyramid 97

7 Moving from Inactivity to Moderate-Intensity
Active Lifestyles 97

8 Cardiorespiratory Endurance 113

9 Vigorous Aerobics, Sports, and Recreational
Activities 135

10 Muscle Fitness and Resistance Exercise 153

11 Flexibility 193

Section IV

Physical Activity: Special
Considerations 217

12 Body Mechanics: Posture, Questionable
Exercises, and Care of the Back and Neck 217

13 Performance Benefits of Physical Activity 253

Section V

Nutrition and Body Composition 275

14 Body Composition 275

Section VI

Stress Management 345

17 Stress and Health 345

18 Stress Management, Relaxation, and Time
Management 359

Section VII

Avoiding Destructive Behaviors 379

19 The Use and Abuse of Tobacco 379

20 The Use and Abuse of Alcohol 391

21 The Use and Abuse of Other Drugs 407

22 Preventing Sexually Transmitted Infections 421

Section VIII

Making Informed Choices 435

23 Cancer, Diabetes, and Other Health
Threats 435

24 Evaluating Fitness and Wellness Products:
Becoming an Informed Consumer 455

25 Toward Optimal Health and Wellness:
Planning for Healthy Lifestyle Change 471

Appendixes

A Metric Conversion Charts 493

B Calories of Protein, Carbohydrates,
and Fats in Foods 494

C Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating 496

References 498

Credits 503

Index 505

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Contents
3 Self-Management and

Self-Planning Skills for Health Behavior
Change 27
Making Lifestyle Changes 28

Factors That Promote Lifestyle Change 29

Self-Management Skills 34

Self-Planning for Healthy Lifestyles 34

Suggested Resources and Readings 39

Lab 3A: Stages of Change
and Self-Management Skills 41

Section II

An Introduction to Physical
Activity 45

4 Preparing for Physical Activity 45
Factors to Consider Prior
to Physical Activity 46

Components of a Typical Bout
of Physical Activity 48

Physical Activity in the
Heat and Cold 50

Physical Activity in Other Environments 54

Soreness and Injury 54

Attitudes about Physical Activity 56

Suggested Resources and Readings 58

Lab 4A: Readiness for Physical Activity 59

Lab 4B: The Warm-Up 61

Lab 4C: Physical Activity Attitude
Questionnaire 63

5 The Health Benefits of Physical
Activity 65
Physical Activity, Fitness, and Wellness 66

Physical Activity and Hypokinetic Diseases 68

Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Diseases 68

Physical Activity and the Healthy Heart 69

Physical Activity and Atherosclerosis 69

Preface xiii

Healthy People 2020 xx

Section I

Lifestyles for Health, Wellness,
and Fitness 1

1 Health, Wellness, Fitness, and Healthy
Lifestyles: An Introduction 1
The HELP Philosophy 2

National Health Goals 2

Health and Wellness 4

Physical Fitness 6

Suggested Resources and Readings 11

Lab 1A: Wellness Self-Perceptions 13

2 Determinants of Lifelong Health,
Wellness, and Fitness 15
Determinants of Health, Wellness, and Fitness 16

Determinants over Which You Have Little
or Some Control 16

Determinants over Which You Have
Greater Control 18

Suggested Resources and Readings 21

Lab 2A: Healthy Lifestyle Questionnaire 23

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Lab 8A: Counting Target Heart Rate and Ratings
of Perceived Exertion 131

Lab 8B: Evaluating Cardiorespiratory
Endurance 133

9 Vigorous Aerobics, Sports,
and Recreational Activities 135
Physical Activity Pyramid: Steps 2 and 3 136

Vigorous Aerobic Activities 138

Vigorous Sports and Recreational Activities 142

Patterns and Trends in Physical Activity
Participation 143

Suggested Resources and Readings 146

Lab 9A: The Physical Activity Adherence
Questionnaire 147

Lab 9B: Planning and Logging Participation in
Vigorous Physical Activity 149

Lab 9C: Combining Moderate and Vigorous
Physical Activity 151

10 Muscle Fitness and Resistance
Exercise 153
Factors Influencing Muscle Fitness 154

Health Benefits of Muscle Fitness Exercise 156

Types of Progressive Resistance Exercise 157

Progressive Resistance Exercise: How Much Is
Enough? 160

Resistance Training Equipment 163

Principles of Muscle Fitness Training 165

Guidelines for Safe and Effective PRE 167

Suggested Resources and Readings 170

Lab 10A: Evaluating Muscle Strength: 1RM and
Grip Strength 185

Lab 10B: Evaluating Muscular Endurance and
Power 187

Lab 10C: Planning and Logging Muscle Fit-
ness Exercises: Free Weights or Resistance
Machines 189

Lab 10D: Planning and Logging Muscle Fit-
ness Exercises: Calisthenics, Core Exercises, or
Plyometrics 191

11 Flexibility 193
Factors Influencing Flexibility 194

Health Benefits of Flexibility and Stretching 196

Stretching Methods 197

Physical Activity and Heart Attack 71

Physical Activity and Other Cardiovascular
Diseases 72

Physical Activity and Metabolic Syndrome 73

Physical Activity and Other Hypokinetic Conditions 74

Physical Activity as a Treatment 78

Suggested Resources and Readings 80

Lab 5A: Assessing Heart Disease Risk Factors 81

6 How Much Physical Activity Is
Enough? 83
The Principles of Physical Activity 84

The FITT Formula 85

The Physical Activity Pyramid 86

Physical Activity Patterns 90

Physical Fitness Standards 91

Suggested Resources and Readings 92

Lab 6A: Self-Assessment of Physical Activity 93

Lab 6B: Estimating Your Fitness 95

Section III

The Physical Activity Pyramid 97

7 Moving from Inactivity to Moderate-
Intensity Active Lifestyles 97
Moving from Inactivity to Active Living 98

The Health and Wellness Benefits of Moderate Physical
Activity 100

How Much Moderate Physical Activity Is Enough? 101

Monitoring Physical Activity Behavior 102

Adopting and Sustaining an Active Identity 106

Suggested Resources and Readings 108

Lab 7A: Setting Goals for Moderate Physical
Activity and Self-Monitoring (Logging) Program 109

Lab 7B: Estimating Sedentary Behavior 111

8 Cardiorespiratory Endurance 113
Elements of Cardiorespiratory Endurance 114

Cardiorespiratory Endurance and Health Benefits 117

The FIT Formula for Cardiorespiratory Endurance 118

Threshold and Target Zones for Intensity of Activity to
Build Cardiorespiratory Endurance 120

Guidelines for Heart Rate and Exercise Monitoring 123

Suggested Resources and Readings 126

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Suggested Resources and Readings 232

Lab 12A: The Back/Neck Questionnaire and
Healthy Back Tests 247

Lab 12B: Evaluating Posture 249

Lab 12C: Planning and Logging Core and Back
Exercises 251

13 Performance Benefits
of Physical Activity 253
High-Level Performance and Training
Characteristics 254

Training for Endurance and Speed 255

Training for Strength and Muscular Endurance 258

Training for Power 259

Training for Functional Fitness and Flexibility 261

Training for High-Level Performance: Skill-Related
Fitness and Skill 262

High-Level Performance Training 263

Performance Trends and Ergogenic Aids 264

Suggested Resources and Readings 266

Lab 13A: Evaluating Skill-Related Physical
Fitness 271

Lab 13B: Identifying Symptoms of
Overtraining 273

Section V

Nutrition and Body
Composition 275

14 Body Composition 275
Understanding and Interpreting Body Composition
Measures 276

How Much Stretch Is Enough? 199

Flexibility-Based Activities 202

Guidelines for Safe and Effective Stretching
Exercise 203

Suggested Resources and Readings 205

Lab 11A: Evaluating Flexibility 213

Lab 11B: Planning and Logging Stretching
Exercises 215

Section IV

Physical Activity: Special
Considerations 217

12 Body Mechanics: Posture, Questionable
Exercises, and Care of the Back and
Neck 217
Anatomy and Function of the Spine 218

Anatomy and Function of the Core Musculature 218

Causes and Consequences of Back and Neck
Pain 220

Prevention of and Rehabilitation from Back and Neck
Problems 222

Good Posture Is Important for Back and Neck
Health 224

Good Body Mechanics Is Important for Back and Neck
Health 228

Exercise Guidelines for Back and Neck Health 228

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Section VI

Stress Management 345

17 Stress and Health 345
Sources of Stress 346

Stress in Contemporary Society 347

Reactions to Stress 348

Stress Effects on Health and Wellness 349

Individual Differences in the Stress Response 351

Suggested Resources and Readings 354

Lab 17A: Evaluating Your Stress Level 355

Lab 17B: Evaluating Your Hardiness
and Locus of Control 357

18 Stress Management, Relaxation,
and Time Management 359
Physical Activity and Stress Management 360

Stress, Sleep, and Recreation 360

Time Management 362

Stress Management 363

Effective Coping Strategies 365

Social Support and Stress Management 370

Suggested Resources and Readings 372

Methods Used to Assess Body Composition 278

Health Risks Associated with Obesity 280

The Origin of Obesity 282

Treatment and Prevention of Overweight and
Obesity 284

Health Risks Associated with Excessively Low Body
Fatness 286

Suggested Resources and Readings 288

Lab 14A: Evaluating Body Composition: Skinfold
Measures 297

Lab 14B: Evaluating Body Composition: Height,
Weight, and Circumference Measures 301

Lab 14C: Determining Your Daily Energy
Expenditure 303

15 Nutrition 307
Guidelines for Healthy Eating 308

Dietary Recommendations for Carbohydrates 311

Dietary Recommendations for Fat 312

Dietary Recommendations for Proteins 314

Dietary Recommendations for Vitamins 316

Dietary Recommendations for Minerals 317

Dietary Recommendations for Water and Other
Fluids 318

Making Well-Informed Food Choices 319

Sound Eating Practices 320

Nutrition and Physical Performance 321

Suggested Resources and Readings 323

Lab 15A: Nutrition Analysis 325

Lab 15B: Selecting Nutritious Foods 329

16 Managing Diet and Activity for Healthy
Body Fatness 331
Factors Influencing Weight and Fat Control 332

Confronting an Obesogenic Environment 334

Guidelines for Losing Body Fat 335

Facts about Fad Diets and Clinical Approaches to
Weight Loss 338

Suggested Resources and Readings 340

Lab 16A: Selecting Strategies for Managing
Eating 341

Lab 16B: Evaluating Fast Food Options 343

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Suggested Resources and Readings 432

Lab 22A: Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk
Questionnaire 433

Section VIII

Making Informed Choices 435

23 Cancer, Diabetes, and Other
Health Threats 435
Cancer 436

Cancer Prevention 443

Diabetes 445

Mental Health 447

Injuries and Other Health Threats 447

Suggested Resources and Readings 449

Lab 23A: Determining Your Cancer Risk 451

Lab 23B: Breast and Testicular Self-Exams 453

24 Evaluating Fitness and Wellness Products:
Becoming an Informed Consumer 455
Quacks and Quackery 456

Physical Activity Quackery 457

Considerations with Exercise Equipment 459

Considerations with Health Clubs and Leaders 460

Considerations with Saunas and Tanning Salons 461

Body Composition Quackery 462

Nutrition Quackery 462

Consumer Protections Against Fraud and
Quackery 463

Health Literacy and the Internet 465

Suggested Resources and Readings 466

Lab 18A: Time Management 373

Lab 18B: Relaxation Exercises 375

Lab 18C: Evaluating Levels of Social Support 377

Section VII

Avoiding Destructive
Behaviors 379

19 The Use and Abuse of Tobacco 379
Tobacco and Nicotine 380

The Health and Economic Costs of Tobacco 380

The Facts about Tobacco Usage 383

Suggested Resources and Readings 388

Lab 19A: Use and Abuse of Tobacco 389

20 The Use and Abuse of Alcohol 391
Alcohol and Alcoholic Beverages 392

Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Abuse 392

Health and Behavioral Consequences of Alcohol
Use 394

Risk Factors for Alcohol-Related Problems 397

Alcohol Use in Young Adults 398

Effective Approaches for Alcohol Prevention
and Treatment 400

Suggested Resources and Readings 401

Lab 20A: Blood Alcohol Level 403

Lab 20B: Perceptions about Alcohol Use 405

21 The Use and Abuse of Other Drugs 407
Classification of Illicit and Prescription Drugs 408

The Consequences of Drug Use 410

Causes of Illicit Drug Abuse 412

Prevalence and Consequences of Illicit Drug
Abuse 413

Suggested Resources and Readings 417

Lab 21A: Use and Abuse of Other Drugs 419

22 Preventing Sexually Transmitted
Infections 421
General Facts 422

HIV/AIDS 422

Common Sexually Transmitted Infections 426

Factors That Contribute to Sexual Risks 429

Prevention and Early Intervention of STIs 431

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Lab 25B: Planning for Improved Health, Wellness,
and Fitness 483

Lab 25C: Planning Your Personal Physical Activity
Program 485

Appendixes

A Metric Conversion Charts 493

B Calories of Protein, Carbohydrates, and Fats
in Foods 494

C Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating 496

References 498

Credits 503

Index 505

Lab 24A: Practicing Consumer Skills: Evaluating
Products 467

Lab 24B: Evaluating a Health, Wellness, or Fitness
Club 469

25 Toward Optimal Health and Well-
ness: Planning for Healthy Lifestyle
Change 471
Understand Inherited Risks and Strengths 472

Make Effective Use of Health Care 473

Consider Environmental Influences on Your
Health 475

Adopt and Maintain Healthy Lifestyles 476

Importance of Personal Actions and Interactions 477

Suggested Resources and Readings 480

Lab 25A: Assessing Factors That Influence Health,
Wellness, and Fitness 481

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Features

1: Changing Fitness Terminology 7
2: Poor Health Status in the United States 18
3: Blue Zones and Personal Responsibility 30
4: CPR Guidelines and AEDs 48
5: 23 and ½ Hours! 79
6: The Tabata Workout 90
7: Every Body Walk 106
8: Online Fitness Tools and Calculators 121
9: Fitness and Physical Activity Trends 141
10: CrossFit Controversy 164
11: Potent Health Benefits from Tai Chi 204
12: Functional Movement Tests 220
13: Impressions of Compression 265
14: Reporting Obesity Trends 276
15: Genetically Modified Foods 321
16: Mindless Eating 333
17: Toxic Stress from Childhood Experiences 352
18: Leisure Time 361
19: E-Cigarettes: Smoking Cessation Aid or Gateway to

Smoking? 384
20: Impaired Driving and Traffic Fatalities 396
21: Public Health Implications of Marijuana

Decriminalization 411
22: HIV Prevention Drugs: Benefits and Risks 424
23: Tanning Beds 442
24: Buyer Be Very Aware 464
25: Healthy Eating Index 476

A CLOSER LOOK

1: Health Websites 10
2: Podcasts 20
3: Health Apps 38
4: Sensing Your Personal Health 55
5: Heart360: Heart Health Monitoring 73
6: Activity Monitors 89
7: Standing Desks and Treadmill Desks 106
8: E-bikes 124
9: Interactive Gaming in Exercise Equipment 140
10: Muscle Repair from Stem Cell Therapy 159
11: Software Facilitates Stretching at Work 196
12: New Training Aids for Core Training 227
13: Smart Ball Technology in Sports 254
14: Saxenda 281
15: Reinventing Veggie Burgers 315
16: Apps for Calorie Tracking 338
17: Effects of Smartphones on Stress and Sleep 350
18: Managing Stress 368
19: Text Messaging for Smoking Cessation 386
20: Alcohol-Sensing Lasers 397
21: Nasal Spray May Help Save Heroin Addicts 416
22: “Hook-Up” Apps May Contribute to STIs 430
23: Smart Contact Lenses 446
24: Paid Testimonials 465
25: Genetic Testing 473

T E C H N O L O G Y U P D A T E

In the News

1: Healthiest Places to Live 4
2: The Built Environment

and Obesity 19
3: Myths and Medical Conspiracy Theories 29
4: Extreme Exercise and the Heart 55
5: Diabetes Epidemic 75
6: Employer Fitness Programming Through the Affordable

Care Act 85
7: Smart Phone Apps for Self-Monitoring 105
8: Running for Your Health 124
9: Cross Training 140
10: Warnings about Muscle Building Supplements 169
11: Yoga as a Complementary Health Approach 197
12: “Sitting Is the New Smoking” 231

13: Extreme Exercise 258
14: Treating Obesity 282
15: Reading the Label 319
16: Best Weight Loss Regimens 339
17: Mental Health of Returning Veterans 350
18: Social Networking for Social Support 370
19: Smoking Cessation 386
20: Are the Health Benefits of Alcohol Exaggerated? 395
21: New Federal Regulations Designed to Decrease

Misuse of Prescription Narcotics 416
22: “Yes Means Yes” 430
23: Do Antibacterial Soaps Really Work? 438
24: Exaggerated Health Claims on Shoes 458
25: Health Insurance 474

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Lab Activities

Lab 1A Wellness Self-Perceptions 13

Lab 2A Healthy Lifestyle Questionnaire 23

Lab 3A Stages of Change and Self-Management Skills 41

Lab 4A Readiness for Physical Activity 59

Lab 4B The Warm-Up 61

Lab 4C Physical Activity Attitude Questionnaire 63

Lab 5A Assessing Heart Disease Risk Factors 81

Lab 6A Self-Assessment of Physical Activity 93

Lab 6B Estimating Your Fitness 95

Lab 7A Setting Goals for Moderate Physical Activity
and Self-Monitoring (Logging) Program 109

Lab 7B Estimating Sedentary Behavior 111

Lab 8A Counting Target Heart Rate and Ratings of Perceived
Exertion 131

Lab 8B Evaluating Cardiorespiratory Endurance 133

Lab 9A The Physical Activity Adherence Questionnaire 147

Lab 9B Planning and Logging Participation in
Vigorous Physical Activity 149

Lab 9C Combining Moderate and Vigorous Physical
Activity 151

Lab 10A Evaluating Muscle Strength: 1RM and Grip
Strength 185

Lab 10B Evaluating Muscular Endurance and Power 187

Lab 10C Planning and Logging Muscle Fitness Exercises:
Free Weights or Resistance Machines 189

Lab 10D Planning and Logging Muscle Fitness Exercises:
Calisthenics, Core Exercises, or Plyometrics 191

Lab 11A Evaluating Flexibility 213

Lab 11B Planning and Logging Stretching Exercises 215

Lab 12A The Back/Neck Questionnaire and Healthy Back
Tests 247

Lab 12B Evaluating Posture 249

Lab 12C Planning and Logging Core and Back Exercises 251

Lab 13A Evaluating Skill-Related Physical Fitness 271

Lab 13B Identifying Symptoms of Overtraining 273

Lab 14A Evaluating Body Composition: Skinfold
Measures 297

Lab 14B Evaluating Body Composition: Height, Weight,
and Circumference Measures 301

Lab 14C Determining Your Daily Energy Expenditure 303

Lab 15A Nutrition Analysis 325

Lab 15B Selecting Nutritious Foods 329

Lab 16A Selecting Strategies for Managing Eating 341

Lab 16B Evaluating Fast Food Options 343

Lab 17A Evaluating Your Stress Level 355

Lab 17B Evaluating Your Hardiness and Locus of Control 357

Lab 18A Time Management 373

Lab 18B Relaxation Exercises 375

Lab 18C Evaluating Levels of Social Support 377

Lab 19A Use and Abuse of Tobacco 389

Lab 20A Blood Alcohol Level 403

Lab 20B Perceptions about Alcohol Use 405

Lab 21A Use and Abuse of Other Drugs 419

Lab 22A Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk
Questionnaire 433

Lab 23A Determining Your Cancer Risk 451

Lab 23B Breast and Testicular Self-Exams 453

Lab 24A Practicing Consumer Skills: Evaluating Products 467

Lab 24B Evaluating a Health, Wellness, or Fitness Club 469

Lab 25A Assessing Factors That Influence Health, Wellness,
and Fitness 481

Lab 25B Planning for Improved Health, Wellness, and
Fitness 483

Lab 25C Planning Your Personal Physical Activity
Program 485

All end-of-concept Lab Activities are available in Connect and can be edited, assigned,
completed, submitted, and graded online.

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Strongly Strongly
Question Agree Agree Disagree Disagree Score

1. I am physically fit. 4 3 2 1

2. I am able to perform the physical tasks of my work. 4 3 2 1

3. I am physically able to perform leisure activities. 4 3 2 1

Physical Wellness  Total 5

4. I am happy most of the time. 4 3 2 1

5. I have good self-esteem. 4 3 2 1

6. I do not generally feel stressed. 4 3 2 1

Emotional/Mental Wellness  Total 5

7. I am well informed about current events. 4 3 2 1

8. I am comfortable expressing my views and opinions. 4 3 2 1

9. I am interested in my career development. 4 3 2 1

Intellectual Wellness  Total 5

10. I have many friends and am involved socially. 4 3 2 1

11. I have close ties with my family. 4 3 2 1

12. I am confident in social situations. 4 3 2 1

Social Wellness  Total 5

13. I am fulfilled spiritually. 4 3 2 1

14. I feel connected to the world around me. 4 3 2 1

15. I have a sense of purpose in my life. 4 3 2 1

Spiritual Wellness Total 5

Comprehensive Wellness
(Sum of five wellness scores)

Lab 1A Wellness Self-Perceptions

Name Section Date

Purpose: To assess self-perceptions of wellness

Procedures

1. Place an X over the appropriate circle for each question (4 5 strongly agree, 3 5 agree, 2 5 disagree, 1 5 strongly disagree).
2. Write the number found in that circle in the box to the right.
3. Sum the three boxes for each wellness dimension to get your wellness dimension totals.
4. Sum all wellness dimension totals to get your comprehensive wellness total.
5. Use the rating chart to rate each wellness area.
6. Complete the Results section and the Conclusions and Implications section.

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Wellness Dimension Score Rating

Physical

Emotional/mental

Intellectual

Social

Spiritual

Comprehensive

Results (Record your scores from the previous page; then determine your ratings
from the Chart).

Rating
Wellness Dimension

Scores
Comprehensive
Wellness Scores

High-level wellness 10–12 50–60

Good wellness 8–9 40–49

Marginal wellness 6–7 30–39

Low-level wellness Below 6 Below 30

Wellness Rating Chart

Conclusions and Implications: Rank each dimension of wellness. Place a 1 by the dimension you need to work on
most and a 2 by the dimension needing the next most work. Rank the others as 3, 4, and 5. Then in the box below, briefly
discuss your wellness ratings. Comment on your current level of wellness and dimensions that could use improvement.

Physical Emotional/mental Intellectual Social Spiritual

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In Tribute
Dr. Ruth Lindsey
1926–2005

On May 29, 2005, we lost a great leader and an outstanding
advocate for healthy lifestyles, physical activity, and physi-
cal education. Our longtime coauthor and friend, Ruth Lind-
sey, will long be remembered as one of the original authors
of Concepts of Fitness and Wellness and for her contribu-
tions to our profession.

Dedication
The authors dedicate this new edition to our families
(spouses, children, and grandchildren) for their support and
sacrifices that enabled us to spend the time necessary to cre-
ate this book.

A Final Word
To list everyone who has made an impact on the Concepts
texts over the years would take several book pages. Never-
theless, we feel that it is important to acknowledge those
who have helped us. A list of those who have contributed to
previous editions is available at www.corbinconcepts.org,
as are additional resources we have provided that support
the use of Concepts of Fitness and Wellness in your course.

Charles B. Corbin
Gregory J. Welk
William R. Corbin
Karen A. Welk
www.corbinconcepts.org

Thank You
Two words, thank you, can never be said enough to the many
people who have helped the Concepts books to be success-
ful, including the thousands of instructors and students who
have taught and learned from these books for more than
50 years. We are proud that the Concepts books were among
the first ever published for use in college fitness and well-
ness courses; that the Surgeon General’s Report on Physical
Activity and Health adopted definitions from the book; and
that instructors have taught and learned from these books for
nearly 50 years.

We listen to those who review our books and to our users,
who provide comments by mail, phone, personal conversations,
and email. Comments and critiques help us make our books
better for both students and instructors. We want to thank the
reviewers for the eleventh edition for their excellent input:

Steven Ball, University of Missouri–Columbia
Mark Deaton, Morehead State University
Patty Donaldson, Angelina College
Mary Ewert-Knodell, North Hennepin Community College
Jackie Franz, Mercer County Community College
Joyce Gronman, Atlantic Cape Community College
Brooke Towner, Coastal Carolina University
Greg Wimer, Armstrong Atlantic State University

In addition to the hundreds of instructors who have
provided reviews for earlier editions, many others are also
deserving of special thanks, including fitness pioneers who
were early adopters and graduate students and employees of
our universities who have helped in so many ways.

We would also like to thank Mark Ahn, of Mark Ahn Cre-
ative Services, for his video production; Vicki Malinee, content
developmental editor; Rick Hecker, project manager; Debra
Kubiak, senior designer; David Tietz, photo researcher; Kristan
Price, digital content …

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