English Assignment

| January 7, 2016

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English 2012/2 EN2080

Research using information literacy ncea level 2

ii EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu english ncea level 2

Expected time to complete work This work will take you about 30 hours to complete. You will work towards the following standards: Achievement Standard 91105 (Version 1) English 2.8 Use information literacy skills to form developed conclusion(s) Level 2, Internal 4 credits In this booklet you will focus on these learning outcomes: • creating a range of increasingly coherent, varied, and complex texts by integrating sources of information and processing strategies • developing, communicating and sustaining increasingly sophisticated ideas, information, and understandings • organising and developing ideas and information for a particular purpose or effect, using the characteristics and conventions of a written report with control. Copyright © 2012 Board of Trustees of Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu, Private Bag 39992, Wellington Mail Centre, Lower Hutt 5045, New Zealand. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu. © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 1 1 Introduction to inquiry 2 The focus of your inquiry 3 Embarking on your inquiry 4 Ready to write 5 Editing and evaluation contents 2 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu how to do the work When you see: 1A Complete the activity. Check your answers. Contact your teacher.

Your teacher will assess this work. You will need:

• this booklet EN2080

• your own paper. Resource overview

In this booklet, you will develop your inquiry skills by completing an inquiry-based research investigation. You will develop your knowledge of the inquiry process and learn how to use information literacy skills to complete an exploration into an area of study. You will also learn how to construct your own developed conclusions about the information you have collected, and how to evaluate the reliability and usefulness of your selected information. The learning outcomes on the inside front cover of this booklet, if achieved, will enable you to meet the standard. Make sure you work through the tasks in order, as the activities in this booklet are designed to help you with planning and undertaking an inquiry. All of the assessment activities are contained within the accompanying booklet, EN2080Y1. Phone or email your teacher now if you have any questions about this assessment. © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 3 1 introduction to inquiry learning outcome Integrate sources of information and prior knowledge purposefully, confidently, and precisely to make sense of increasingly varied and complex texts. learning intention(s) In this lesson you will learn to: • identify the concept of inquiry-based research • identify information literacy skills. introduction This Achievement Standard requires you to complete an inquiry into a topic, linked to a written, visual or oral text that you have studied as part of your EN2000 course. By dictionary definition, inquiry means ‘the act of seeking information by questioning.’ Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century by Carol C Kuhlthau, Leslie K. Maniotes and Ann K Caspari states that: ‘Inquiry is an approach to learning whereby students find and use a variety of sources of information and ideas to increase their understanding of a problem, topic or issue … It espouses [supports] investigation, exploration, search, quest, research, pursuit, and study. Inquiry does not stand alone: it engages, interests and challenges students to connect their world with the curriculum.’ This inquiry research investigation will enable you to demonstrate your information literacy skills and your ability to form developed conclusions from your investigation. information literacy skills Information literacy can be defined as ‘the ability to recognise the extent and nature of information needed, then to locate, evaluate, and effectively use the needed information.’ Plattsburgh State University of New York website, www.plattsburgh.edu/library/instruction/ informationliteracydefinition.php

Using information literacy skills means:

• framing your inquiry

• selecting and using appropriate inquiry methods and processing strategies

• evaluating the reliability and usefulness of selected information to your inquiry

• forming and presenting developed conclusions.

In your inquiry, you will need to select at least four sources that relate to the topic you have chosen. You will need to locate and evaluate information from these sources that will help you answer and draw conclusions about your three key questions. These steps are outlined in more detail in further lessons in this booklet. You will work independently on your inquiry, but your teacher can help you deal with any problems or questions that may arise along the way. 4 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu 2 the focus of your inquiry learning outcome Organise and develop ideas and information for a particular purpose or effect, using the characteristics and conventions of a written report with control. learning intention In this lesson, you will learn to:

• select an area for inquiry that will allow for investigation across a range of sources. introduction The first step for you is to decide what initial text you will use to help you investigate an area for inquiry. starting point

• You will choose an area for your inquiry based on an initial text you have read, viewed, reviewed or studied. This could include To Kill a Mockingbird, Lord of the Flies, Fish Skin Suit or any other Year 12 text you have read or viewed as part of your programme this year. Check the text’s appropriateness with your teacher first.

• This text will form the basis of your inquiry; you will investigate your area using at least another three sources (four sources in total). Examples of possible sources and topics include: Text: 1984 by George Orwell. Topic: Society and the control of individuals. Text: Tu by Patricia Grace. Topic: The experience of war. istockphoto.com © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 5 Text: ‘The Doll’s House’ by Katherine Mansfield. Topic: The effects of the social divide. Text: The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Topic: Exploring the experiences of the immigrant. Text: Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt. Topic: The effects of poverty on children. Phone or email your teacher once you have decided on your initial text, to check that it is appropriate. framing your inquiry – identifying an area for investigation Once you have got your text approved, consider the themes or issues that are raised in it. This will provide the basis of your inquiry. An example has been provided for you as a guide, using ‘The Doll’s House’ by Katherine Mansfield. My chosen text: ‘The Doll’s House’ by Katherine Mansfield. Issues or themes apparent in this text: Now fill in the following with your own information: My chosen text: Issues or themes apparent in this text: Your teacher will be interested in reading your answers. 2A Control over others Prejudice Social class issues Poverty versus wealth Bullying the focus of your inquiry 6 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu formulating a topic statement A topic statement is a statement that you will investigate across all of your sources. It should be a statement that has a specific direction and allows for a full exploration of your chosen sources. Your topic statement should also allow you to draw conclusions about the information you collect. Sentence starters you could use to help you develop your topic statement are:

• The effect of …

• The extent of …

• The experience of …

Choose ONE issue or theme from your brainstorm, and use it to formulate a topic statement. Remember, you want to develop a topic statement that will allow you to fully investigate and evaluate your theme or issue. Make sure your topic covers a variety of different viewpoints and provides you with the opportunity to achieve the standard at every level (i.e. Achieved, Merit and Excellence). Make sure the topic statement you develop is not too broad. This will make it difficult for you to form specific conclusions about the texts you have selected. Here’s an example. I selected ‘The Doll’s House’ as the basis of my inquiry, then I wrote down ‘Poverty vs Wealth’ as part of my brainstorm. Using this phrase and the setting of the story, I could formulate a topic statement such as ‘The effects of the social divide.’ Once you have decided on your topic statement, write it here: Phone or email your teacher now to get your topic statement approved. If you are unsure of which text to choose, or how to develop a topic statement, phone or email your teacher and ask for assistance. Note down what you discussed with your teacher in the box below: 2B the focus of your inquiry © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 7 3 embarking on your inquiry learning outcome Organise and develop ideas and information for a particular purpose or effect, using the characteristics and conventions of a written report with control. learning intentions In this lesson, you will learn how to:

• form three key questions that allow for a full investigation into your topic

• select and identify a source list, with at least four appropriate sources from at least two categories

• construct a data evaluation chart to record selected information from your sources

• identify and develop conclusions about the information you have gathered.

introduction Now that you have chosen your text and developed your topic statement, you are ready to begin the inquiry process. Inquiry involves asking yourself the following questions: What do I know? What do I need to know? How do I find it out? What did I learn? How do I use what I learned? What will I do next time? You have already decided on what you know (i.e. you have identified the issues that you want to focus on from your initial chosen text) and what you need to know (i.e. you have addressed this through your topic statement). The next lessons in this booklet will concentrate on:

• how to find out about and evaluate your topic statement, using at least four sources

• how to present what you learned from your research, by evaluating, questioning and challenging the information you have gathered

• how to use what you have learned to form your own conclusions. 8 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu selecting and using appropriate strategies to locate and process information forming and developing three key questions Before you can begin researching your topic, you need to form three key questions. These questions can be based on what you already know about your sources and what you want to find out from them. Your key questions should be open and invite interpretation rather than just a recall of facts from the sources.

• Make sure you develop open questions; that is, questions that cannot be answered by a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Questions that begin with the words why or how are open. • Your questions should encourage you to give examples (to show ideas and issues) and to reach conclusions about the issues raised in your sources. If we return to ‘The Doll’s House’ example, here are some questions that look at the how and why of an issue, based on the topic, ‘The effects of the social divide’. Each question can be applied to the other texts I choose to include in my investigation.

• How is the social divide created? • How does the social divide affect New Zealanders today?

• How important is it to close the social divide? Things to consider:

• Think about the order of your questions – some come naturally before others.

• You may need to change your questions later, or modify them in some way. This is all part of the inquiry process. Once you have decided on your three questions, write them here: 3A 1. 2. embarking on your inquiry © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 9 3. Please phone or email your teacher now to discuss your questions with them. Note down what you discussed with your teacher in the box below: selecting your sources

• You need to gather information about your key questions from at least four sources which should come from at least two different categories. Selecting sources from a range of categories will allow you to investigate your area of inquiry more fully.

• Try to include at least two non-fictional sources to support the points raised in your fictional sources.

• You must select the sources; they may be selected from written, oral and/or visual sources.

• Possible categories include: – non-fiction – films – documentaries – articles – material from the internet (e.g. articles or papers) Make sure you choose information from a reputable website (i.e. a website that can be trusted). Contact your teacher if you are unsure whether a website is reputable or not – an interview with someone who has knowledge of your topic or an opinion relevant to your topic – fiiction. 3B embarking on your inquiry 10 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu Remember that all of your sources need to relate to the area of inquiry you have chosen, and they need to assist you in answering your three key questions. Think of your initial text as a springboard to the texts you will consult for your research investigation: it provides you with the initial idea. Here is an example source list for the topic statement, ‘The effects of social class in New Zealand’:

• ‘The Doll’s House’ by Katherine Mansfield (short story)

• ‘The Growing Divide: A State of the Nation Report’ from The Salvation Army (2012) on www.salvationarmy.org.nz

• ‘Show a Bit of Class’ by Joanna Black (magazine article)

• ‘Divided We Stand: Why Inequality Keeps Rising’ – 2011 OECD report (www.oecd.org/social/soc/49170768.pdf)

• ‘Greedy Warriors of Privilege Threaten our Decent Society’ by Tim Hazledine (online newspaper article)

• ‘It’s Time for Higher Pay to Filter Down’ by Tim Hazledine (online newspaper article)

• ‘How Economic Inequality Harms Societies’ by Richard Wilkinson (online: a TED Talk, July 2011). Finding your sources There are a number of ways in which you can find sources that relate to your area of inquiry.

• Conduct a search on the internet, using key words from your topic statement. Conduct a search on the computers at your local library, using the same key words.

• If you are a full time student, you can login to the Te Kura library on this website: www.tekura.school.nz/login and conduct a search using key words. You can also contact the library on 0800 65 99 88 (extension 8783) or by email: library@tekura.school.nz. Now develop your own source list, using sources that relate to your topic.

Contact your teacher if you are confused about what to choose. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Phone or email your teacher now to discuss your sources with them. embarking on your inquiry © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 11 Note down what you discussed with your teacher in the box below: data evaluation After locating and processing your information, you must be able to evaluate the reliability and usefulness of your information to your inquiry. Before you read or view your sources, or before you conduct an interview, draw up the following chart on refill or on the computer. You will use this chart to write down information from your texts that is relevant to your inquiry. Use at least one page per source/text. Data evaluation chart Source Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 Evaluation of source/ information 3C istockphoto.com embarking on your inquiry 12 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu

• As you read or view your sources, use this chart to record notes for your report. You will need to note down single words, phrases, quotes and ideas which can be expanded later into fuller notes.

• You will also need to record specific details, such as titles and publication details of books, films or magazines. You will need these details for the bibliography in your report.

• Include your own conclusions about the issues raised in each text.

• Evaluate the usefulness of your sources to your inquiry topic. Ask yourself, ‘Was this useful for my research?’ ‘Which parts of the text answer one of my key questions?’ This is an essential step in the process. You MUST submit a data evaluation chart with your final investigation. If you do not evaluate the usefulness of your sources, you will not achieve this standard. Here is a partial example to guide you. Sources Question 1: How is the social divide created? Question 2: How does the social divide affect New Zealanders today? Question 3: How important is it to close the social divide? Evaluation of source/ information Provide statements about how useful your sources were in relation to your inquiry. ‘The Growing Divide’ – 2012 report from The Salvation Army. www. salvationarmy. org.nz ‘… narrow economic rationalism … brought us the global economic crisis, burgeoning private debt and an increasingly divided nation.’ One in five children lives in ‘material hardship’. The most marginalised people are most likely to commit and be the victims of crime. Too many young people, mainly poor, leave school with no qualifications and drift into crime or to becoming parents early. The Salvation Army’s provision of food aid to poor families has more than doubled in just five years. Maori are grossly over-represented in prison populations. We need to provide opportunities for young people. We need many more taxpayers because the retirement population is expanding rapidly. Benefit dependency, prisons and poor health are enormous financial costs to society. This is a 92 page document. The Salvation Army work with NZ’s poor. This is their fifth ‘State of the Nation’ report. They are reputable, ‘a conservative Christian organisation.’ They are reasonably ‘neutral’ politically. embarking on your inquiry © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 13 Sources Question 1: How is the social divide created? Question 2: How does the social divide affect New Zealanders today? Question 3: How important is it to close the social divide? Evaluation of source/ information Provide statements about how useful your sources were in relation to your inquiry. ‘Greedy warriors of privilege threaten our Decent Society.’ www.nzherald. co.nz/ business/ news/article. cfm?c_ id=3&objectid= 10775801 The big leap in inequality in NZ occurred 1987– 1995 due to the ‘Rogernomics’ reforms. The ‘share of the cake’ of the highest-earning 1% declined worldwide 1900– 1980. In NZ now, this group gain 10% of the share of income. Bosses/topearners’ salaries have increased far more than the workers beneath them. Income equality has increased in most countries in the last 30 years. NZ leads the pack according to the OECD report, ‘Divided We Stand’. Bosses’ huge salaries hold down the wages of the workers below them. Article in the NZ Herald (30/12/2011). Hazledine is a Professor of Economics at the University of Auckland. Hazledine is the author of Taking New Zealand Seriously: The Economics of Decency. ‘It’s time for higher pay to filter down.’ www.nzherald. co.nz/ business/ news/article. cfm?c_ id=3&objectid= 10840714 Our economy is depressed because we don’t save enough. We don’t save because we can’t afford to because of low salaries … except for those at the top. Research from Auckland University: the rate of abuse of very young children whose parents (or parent) were on welfare was around 10x the average. Talked about a story on Close Up where a family earning $70K struggled to make ends meet. This is well above the average salary. ‘… investing in happy, healthy children is smart economics, too – they are our future workers and entrepreneurs.’ Providing a ‘living wage’ would help the economy (e.g. we would save more). Another NZ Herald article from Hazledine (16/10/2012). Similar to the article above. Perhaps I need to find an argument from the other side? embarking on your inquiry 14 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu Sources Question 1: How is the social divide created? Question 2: How does the social divide affect New Zealanders today? Question 3: How important is it to close the social divide? Evaluation of source/ information Provide statements about how useful your sources were in relation to your inquiry. ‘How economic inequality harms societies’ a TED talk by Richard Wilkinson. www.ted.com/ talks/richard_ wilkinson.html I will check Wilkinson’s book, The Sprit Level for more NZ specific data. NZ = 5th worst performance on Wilkinson’s ‘Index of health and social problems’ (e.g. obesity, mental illness, imprisonment). NZ = 2nd on UNICEF Index of Child Wellbeing. More equal societies have better health, are less obese, have more social mobility, have fewer murders, less drug abuse, less imprisonment and MORE … But everyone is better off – e.g. costs of health care drop. People will feel more valued. Some countries are already doing better – e.g. Japan, Sweden, Norway, Finland. Richard Wilkinson was Professor Emeritus of Social Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham. He wrote The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better with Kate Pickett. They run a website called The Equality Trust. They have had to defend the reliability of their data. embarking on your inquiry © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 15 developing conclusions: questioning, challenging and evaluating the ideas and information gathered in your inquiry Conclusions are your own statements about the information you have collected. This includes expressing an opinion or judgment, reaching a decision, or suggesting a solution. When forming your conclusions, you should ‘transform the information you have collected into understandings that are new to you.’ When making your own statements about the information you have collected (i.e. conclusions), consider the following: • Why do the people in your sources feel the way they do? How are they affected by others? What lessons do we learn from these experiences? • What impact does society have on the topic you have chosen? How can we relate this to the wider world, or the society that we are from? For Merit or Excellence, you must present conclusions that are reasoned and connected to the purpose of inquiry, and which show insight or originality in thought or interpretation. You should try to link these conclusions to the wider world or the human experience. Always think about what lessons we can learn from the information presented in each of your sources/texts. Further information on how to form your own conclusions is outlined in the next lesson. embarking on your inquiry 16 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu 4 ready to write learning outcomes Organise and develop ideas and information for a particular purpose or effect, using the characteristics and conventions of a written report with control. Develop, communicate and sustain increasingly sophisticated ideas, information, and understandings. learning intention In this lesson, you will learn how to: • structure an effective paragraph. introduction In this lesson, you will work through activities that will assist you in planning and writing your report for your inquiry-based investigation. Read through the NZQA exemplars at www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/ qualifications/ncea/subjects/english/annotated-exemplars/level-2-as91105-b/ These show you what level of performance will be required to obtain an Achieved, Merit or Excellence grade for Achievement Standard 91105. Please note that the exemplars contain only some of the planning notes taken from each text. You will need to attach all of your work to your report to show that you have worked through the inquiry process. The commentaries on the exemplars give you an idea of what the marker will look for; try to include these in your writing. Note: • You may not use any of the example material from this booklet, or the NZQA exemplars. • You must send in your key questions, your source list, your data evaluation chart(s), a draft and final copy of your report, a bibliography and a self-evaluation. requirements Your report should consist of: • at least 500 words • an introduction that outlines your topic statement, the sources you have read to assist you in your inquiry and your three key questions • three sections that answer each of your three key questions (make the key question the heading for each section) • two or three paragraphs under each section, explaining how each text answers the questions you have developed • supporting evidence to justify the points you make • a final conclusion • a bibliography. 4A © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 17 dont forget … That you can include your written report as part of your writing folio (see booklets EN2040, EN2041 and EN2042), which can, in turn, be submitted for assessment for AS91101: Produce a selection of crafted and controlled writing, an internal standard worth six credits at NCEA Level 2. Discuss this possibility with your teacher. writing paragraphs to develop your ideas Use the SEC RILS model to develop your paragraphs logically. The following is a sample of a student’s work based on @The effects of the social divide’. Letter Explanation Sample of student work S Statement – a broad statement or topic sentence which is relevant to the question and your topic statement. It gives direction to your paragraph. Strong words are used to sum up what you are going to discuss and what the author is trying to say. Sentence starters: The importance of … These themes are developed by … The reader is placed in a position to judge … A clear contrast is established … We like to think of ourselves as a fair and equal society, but New Zealand’s social divide is one of the widest and fastest-growing in the world. ready to write 18 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu E Examples and evidence woven through. Sentence starters: The significance of … The reader can see parallels developing … The 2011 OECD report into inequality, ‘Divided We Stand’, states that the average income of the richest 10% of the population (in ‘advanced economies’) is about nine times that of the poorest 10%. Prof Tim Hazledine of Auckland University goes further and says (16/10/2012 – NZ Herald) that in New Zealand, ‘The top 0.1% of income earners now pluck pay packets totalling about 5% of the country’s wage bill … this share has doubled over the past 20 years.’ But what do these numbers actually mean? C Comment on: • Relevance – why is this event/ character/idea important? • Implications – what does this mean? What wider significance might it imply? • Link back to the topic sentence. • Significance – how does this connect to other parts of the topic? Try to ‘build a bridge’ to connect one paragraph to the next. Sentence starters: The relationships demonstrate … The evidence highlights … The choice of content refers the reader … The consequences of the social divide are shameful. Auckland University research shows that the rate of abuse of children whose parents (or parent) were on welfare was around ten times the average (see Hazledine). From 2007–2012, the amount of food aid that The Salvation Army has provided to poor families has doubled. In their 2012 ‘State of the Nation’ report, they also say that people living on the margins are more likely to commit and be the victim of crime. This in turn has contributed to New Zealand having the 7th highest prison population in the OECD. Abuse, hunger and crime are just some of the sideeffects of the growing social divide in our country. Despite evidence to the contrary, we like to cling to our clean, green image and think that these issues do not plague New Zealand society. Some argue that there has always been a social divide and that there will always be winners and losers. But even if some are happy to ignore the moral imperative to improve the lives of those at the bottom, compelling evidence has shown that taking steps to close the social divide benefits ALL members of society. Now, it’s your turn to draft some paragraph length answers to your key questions. Phone or email your teacher now if you need assistance with your draft. 4B ready to write © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 19 5 editing and evaluation learning outcomes Create a range of increasingly coherent, varied, and complex texts by integrating sources of information and processing strategies. Develop, communicate and sustain increasingly sophisticated ideas, information, and understandings. Organise and develop ideas and information for a particular purpose or effect, using the characteristics and conventions of a written report with control. learning intentions In this lesson you will learn how to: • self-evaluate your work to show that you have followed the inquiry process • write a bibliography. introduction Once you have finished drafting your report, you need to work on editing and preparing the final copy of your report. Remember that this must be your own work. You may refer back to any part of the booklet, a dictionary or your sources, but you may not include any of the material from the examples in this booklet or the NZQA exemplars. Read back over the notes in this booklet and the NZQA exemplars online for ideas on improving your report. Look at the assessment schedule in EN2080Y1. Editing can involve: • rewriting sections that are not as good as they could be • adding detail or examples • rearranging or changing the structure of your report • clarifying your conclusions • checking the layout of your bibliography • reading your work aloud to listen for errors or things that could be improved. This means that you’ll need to write on your first draft and cross out bits, add bits, and/or move bits. Don’t worry if your first draft begins to look a little messy. At this stage, please contact your teacher if you are unsure of any aspect of your investigation. You can also choose to send your draft into your teacher for feedback. Once you have done this, you should write (or word process) and carefully proofread your final draft. 5A 20 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu self-evaluation Use the following check method to confirm that you have provided evidence of all the steps in the inquiry process. Tick the appropriate boxes and fill in the appropriate information, and attach it to the rest of your research material for submission with EN2080Y1. Uses information literacy skills effectively Evidence Student Teacher My inquiry is based around an area of interest that arises from my personal reading or my English studies. Initial text chosen and brainstorm constructed around this text. I have made the focus of my inquiry clear. Refer to lesson 2. Inquiry has been framed, focus is identified through topic statement. I have posed at least three appropriate questions. Questions are openended and explore the how and why of my topic. I have selected information and assessed its reliability. Effective note-making demonstrated in data chart. Evaluation of sources demonstrated in data chart. Review I have analysed my sources and thought about possible conclusions. For example (briefly write your main conclusions here): I have reviewed the original text in light of my research. The conclusions that I have developed, based on the evidence I gathered are (briefly write your main conclusions about your initial text here): 5B editing and evaluation © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 21 writing a bibliography A bibliography is a list of books, short texts, articles, films and other sources you use when researching a topic and writing an assignment. It is essential that you list the sources you have used at the end of your work. In short, you have to acknowledge the work of others; otherwise, it is plagiarism. how to set out a bibliography There are many formats or styles for writing a bibliography. For our purposes, we will use the APA (American Psychological Association) citation style which is widely-used and is accepted by New Zealand universities. We will use the texts from Activity 3B to create an exemplar bibliography. how to reference different text types books By one author Format Author. (Year of publication). Title of book. Place of publication: Publisher. Example Eldred-Grigg, Stevan. (1987). Oracles and Miracles. Auckland, New Zealand: Penguin. Edited book Format Author(s) (Ed(s).). (Year of publication). Title of book. Place of publication: Publisher. Example Sinclair, Sir Keith (Ed.). (1998). The Oxford Illustrated History of New Zealand. Auckland, New Zealand: Oxford University Press. poetry and short stories Part of a collection Format Author(s). (Year of publication). Title of poem/story. Title of Collection. Place of publication: Publisher. Example Mansfield, Katherine. (2007). The Doll’s House. The Collected Short Stories. London: Penguin. editing and evaluation 22 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu articles Magazine article Format Author(s). (Year, month and day of publication). Title of article. Name of Publication, volume (issue). Example Black, Joanne. (2005, May 28). Show a Bit of Class. The New Zealand Listener. (3394). media Feature film Format Director. (Publication date). Title of work [Medium of publication]. Country of origin: Studio. Example Campion, Jane. (1993). The Piano [Motion picture]. Australia: Australian Film Commission. internet sources If the author is known Format Author(s). (Publication date). Title of Web page. Retrieved from URL Example Hazledine, Tim. (2011, December 30th). Greedy Warriors of Privilege Threaten Our Decent Society. Retrieved from www.nzherald.co.nz/ business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10775801 Web page created by Format organisation: Organisation. (Date). Title of Web page. Retrieved from URL Example Wikipedia. (2011). Social Class in New Zealand. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_class_in_New_Zealand editing and evaluation © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 23 Finally, here is our exemplar bibliography. You will note that it is arranged in alphabetical order. • Black, Joanne. (2005, May 28). Show a Bit of Class. The New Zealand Listener. (3394). • Campion, Jane. (1993). The Piano [Motion picture]. Australia: Australian Film Commission. • Eldred-Grigg, Stevan. (1987). Oracles and Miracles. Auckland, New Zealand: Penguin. • Hazledine, Tim. (2011, December 30th). Greedy Warriors of Privilege Threaten Our Decent Society. Retrieved from www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_ id=3&objectid=10775801 • Mansfield, Katherine. (2007). The Doll’s House. The Collected Short Stories. London: Penguin. • Sinclair, Sir Keith (Ed.). (1998). The Oxford Illustrated History of New Zealand. Auckland, New Zealand: Oxford University Press. • Wikipedia. (2012). New Zealand. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_zealand For more information on how to cite your sources in your assignments, please visit the following website: www.cite.auckland.ac.nz/index.php?p=quickcite editing and evaluation 24 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 25 acknowledgements Every effort has been made to acknowledge and contact copyright holders. Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu apologies for any omissions and welcomes more accurate information. iStockPhoto: Photo: Colourful books. 8295173 Photo Detective. 6874244 26 EN2080 © te aho o te kura pounamu © te aho o te kura pounamu EN2080 27 © te aho o te kura pounamu Fill in the rubric by ticking the boxes you think apply for your work. This is an opportunity for you to reflect on your achievement in this topic and think about what you need to do next. It will also help your teacher. Write a comment if you want to give your teacher more feedback about your work or to ask any questions. Fill in your name and ID number. Student name: Student ID: Not yet attempted Didn’t understand Understood some Understood most Very confident in my understanding Create a range of increasingly coherent, varied, and complex texts by integrating sources of information and processing strategies. Develop, communicate and sustain increasingly sophisticated ideas, information, and understandings. Organise and develop ideas and information for a particular purpose or effect, using the characteristics and conventions of a written report with control. Please place your comments in the relevant boxes below. Student comment Create a range of increasingly coherent, varied, and complex texts by integrating sources of information and processing strategies. Develop, communicate and sustain increasingly sophisticated ideas, information, and understandings. Organise and develop ideas and information for a particular purpose or effect, using the characteristics and conventions of a written report with control. Any further student comments. self-assessment EN2080 teacher use only Teacher comment Please find attached letter © te aho o te kura pounamu Phone, fax or email your teacher if you want to talk about any of this work. Freephone 0800 65 99 88 self-assessment authentication statement I certify that the assessment work is the original work of the student named above. for school use only assessment www.tekura.school.nz cover sheet – EN2080 students – place student address label below or write in your details. Full Name ID No. Address (If changed) Signed (Student) Signed (Supervisor)

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Essay Quiz
Assignment 3: Information Governance

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