Coastline Community College African American Studies Annotated Bibliography Class is African American studies and my proposal is, how does gender contribut

Coastline Community College African American Studies Annotated Bibliography Class is African American studies and my proposal is, how does gender contribute on Intersectional Discrimination

In addition to general bibliographic information, annotated bibliographic entries also include 2-3
sentences about each resource (book, article, media, etc) explaining why this resource will be
useful to you toward your research question. Sometimes you will find that although a resource is
well regarded in the subject, it is not particularly useful to your research question.
Ex. If your topic focuses upon a particular group (like women or Jamaican people) the
resource may not address them specifically, and would thus not be a good choice for your
project, although generally it might be good for the larger topic. You will have to decide
what is a good choice and what is not.

Write 15 bibliographic entires to support the research question: How does gender contribute to intersectional discrimination?

Annotated Bibliography Final Project

WHAT IS AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY?

An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief descriptive and evaluative paragraph, the annotation. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, quality, and in some cases accuracy of the sources cited.

YOUR ASSIGNMENT

Select a topic or person of interest related to Race and Contemporary Society – Use your syllabus as a guide for ideas or you may select something else with my approval.

You will first submit a 1 page proposal with your topic clearly stated, and then 3 paragraphs or so summarizing your proposed research question about your topic. What are you seeking to know? What interests you about this topic or person? This will be due by Apr 9, but the earlier you get this initial phase completed, the more time you have for feedback from me, and more time to put the final project together.

This project does not entail writing a full research paper, instead it will give you the scholarly practice of doing research, from proposal stage to sorting and ultimately collecting the most relevant sources for your project.

Your final project that you hand in on Apr 21 will be a completed annotated bibliography along with your final proposal that will likely have changed from your original proposal you submitted. As you do the research your original question may shift, or the direction you want to go will change based on information you find. This is common.

FORMAT

In addition to general bibliographic information, annotated bibliographic entries also include 2-3 sentences about each resource (book, article, media, etc) explaining why this resource will be useful to you toward your research question. Sometimes you will find that although a resource is well regarded in the subject, it is not particularly useful to your research question.

Ex. If your topic focuses upon a particular group (like women or Jamaican people) the resource may not address them specifically, and would thus not be a good choice for your project, although generally it might be good for the larger topic. You will have to decide what is a good choice and what is not.

Overall your bibliography should reflect multiple types of sources: books, journal articles, electronic media, film, music, art, etc, for a total of 15 materials

Your bibliography should be numbered 1 -15 and sorted by type, (all books together, all articles together, etc). This should be a formatted bibliography with full reference information on each material.

Use MLA Bibliographic Style, the internet has many resources and examples. Consult with the research librarian as well if necessary.

Proposals for the annotated bibliography project should include three paragraphs:

Describe the chosen topic, including why the topic interest you.
Provide a clear research question (in the form of a question). Explain what you hope to find and how you plan to find it. Describe five materials you have found so far (type, general content). As you do your research, the question you’re answering may change but you still need to start out with a clear goal.
Provide a clear statement and explanation of how this topic relates to the course materials (Race & Contemporary Society).

Grading (20 points possible)

Annotated Bibliography Project Grading Criteria

1st Proposal, due Apr 9
Final bibliography to include:

15 Materials

(good quality and relevant to your topic, variety of materials: books, media, articles etc, all related to paper topic, appropriately formatted bibliography; numbered bibliography; organized by material type

Final Revised Proposal
Well Organized
Due Apr 21

Recap:

1The project requires you to gather 15 varied materials.

Choose a topic related to the course and begin to find materials on it. You can research an issue, an event, or a leader related to Intersectionality in some manner. Try to choose something as specific as possible – not just “Intersectionality” but maybe “White, Christian, Gay Politicians” or “Muslim Women in America.” Think carefully and make sure to choose a topic that interests you; this project can be fun and interesting if you give it some thought. The sooner you can begin to collect materials, the sooner you can see if you need to go broader or narrower based on the availability of resources. It will be easier to collect materials if you have a research question in mind. You may be able to come up with one right away, or you may need to gather a few materials before you can come up with a question. Use the Ask a Librarian feature on the LMU Library website!
Draft a proposal declaring your research question, and how this relates to the course. The first research question will guide you in collecting materials. Then once you have collected all of your materials, you may or may not need to change your research question for the final project. For now, your research question will guide you in collecting materials. That’s all you need to worry about at this point – constructing a research question that will help you gather relevant materials.

Examples of different types of materials:

full – length books if accessible, might be books we have used in class
academic journal articles
popular magazine articles
newspaper clippings (copied from hard copies or printed from the internet)
interviews
fieldnotes and reflections from community – based learning
tv or radio news recordings
visual images (films, TV shows, commercials, etc.)
auditory images
statistical data
government data, including policy or legal considerations of this topic
advocacy data, written by groups organized to represent this topic in some capacity
newspaper editorials
websites (be careful with sites you cite, not all websites are legitimate, NO Wikipedia)

Annotated Bibliography Examples

Anderson, Victor. Creative Exchange: A Constructive Theology of African American Religious Experience. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2008.

Victor Anderson’s new book seeks to provide a pragmatic but principled way forward for African American religion and life. By critically examining the African American theological landscape shaped by black liberation theology, slave narratives and womanism, Creative Exchange proposes a relational concept of race that resists racial essentialism and moves beyond the triad of struggle, survival, and resistance. Rather, Anderson argues that African American religious experience is actually an ongoing creative exchange that relates in many ways to its history, religious institutions, families, and faith communities.

Balaji, Murali. The Professor and the Pupil: The Politics and Friendship of W.E.B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson. New York: Nation Books, 2007.

W.E.B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson helped to lead the African American struggle for human rights during the first half of the twentieth century, advocating an internationalist perspective that called for the emancipation of all oppressed peoples in the dusk of the colonial era. The Professor and the Pupil is the first book to chronicle their forty-year friendship and illuminate the similarities that made them so close. Journalist Murali Balaji explores how both men evolved into leaders of the American Left, examining their philosophical transformation and their alienation from mainstream political thought following World War II. Balaji explains why Du Bois and Robeson became ostracized for their political views and why so few African leaders stood up to defend them during the height of the Cold War. In examining the lives of both men, The Professor and the Pupil also details the changing social and political conditions around the world that led Du Bois and Robeson to their political epiphanies, and eventually their fall from grace in the United States.

Moore, Rebecca, Pinn, Anthony, B., and Sawyer, Mary, R., eds. Peoples Temple and Black Religion in America. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2004.

The Peoples Temple movement ended on November 18, 1978, when more than 900 men, women, and children died in a ritual of murder and suicide in their utopianist community of Jonestown, Guyana. Only a handful lived to tell their story. As is well known, Jim Jones was white, but most of his followers were black. Despite that, little has been written about Peoples Temple in the context of black religion in America. In ten essays, all but three specially commissioned for this volume, scholars from various disciplines address this gap in the scholarship on Peoples Temple. Twenty-five years after the tragedy at Jonestown, they assess the impact of Peoples Temple on the black religious experience.

Submit a Comment