BUS 156 University of California Riverside Lee Cockerell Case Study Questions 1. Do you think it would be unusual for a manager such as Lee Cockerell to sp

BUS 156 University of California Riverside Lee Cockerell Case Study Questions 1. Do you think it would be unusual for a manager such as Lee Cockerell to spend a significant portion of his time motivating his employees? Explain.

2. Which of the needs on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs could delivering exceptional customer service at Disney satisfy? Why?

3. Is it possible for Cockerell’s efforts to succeed in motivating workers yet be detrimental to organiza- tional success? Explain.

Notes:

The assignment should be one or two pages (double-spaced).

Encourage to bring outsides sources to case study.

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Walt Disney Company is a worldwide media and
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ESPN, Pixar Animation Studios, Marvel Studios, and
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Ineffective processes, on the other hand, create hassles,
and hassles lead to alienated customers and frustrated
employees.”
Finally, Cockerell insists that managers should be the
embodiment of a great leader in order to keep associates
motivated. “Like it or not,” he said, “leaders are being
watched, evaluated, and emulated, so they have to behave
like impeccable professionals at all times. True profession-
als are not only competent, they personify integrity, dig-
nity, and reliability every minute of their working lives.” For
this reason, Cockerell says that it is important to develop
character and know one’s values. “Great leaders,” he said,
“know what they stand for, and they communicate their
values to their people. They are always prepared to do the
right thing
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THE MOTIVATION CHALLENGE
Lee Cockerell, executive vice president of operations
for Walt Disney Company, focuses on basic principles
that motivate employees. According to the Challenge
yees’
stand
How Disney Motivates Its
Employees
Aree
t one point in his career at Walt Disney Company,
1Lee Cockerell was the executive vice president of
ates at four theme parks; three water parks; 20 resorts;
five golf courses, and several sports complexes, enter-
tainment venues, and retail stores. Managing that many
individuals requires solid leadership and the ability to
motivate employees at all levels of the organization.
Alpha and Omega Collection/Alamy Stock Photo
Cockerell states that the essence of effective manage-
ment can be found in a handful of tenets that he has
on
Walt Disney Company is a worldwide
entertainment business with subsid
theme parks, resorts, the ABC televi
ESPN, Pixar Animation Studios, Mar
LucasFilm.
ireer.
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ation,
discovered throughout his career. First, managers should
realize that every team member is important. “A truly
inclusive leader,” Cockerell said, “creates an open, friendly,
collaborative environment. The reason is simple: When
everyone matters and everyone knows they matter,
employees are happy to come to work, and to give you all
their energy, creativity, and loyalty.” Conversely, if associ-
ates do not feel included, they tend to perform poorly.
Second, he points out that employees are the brand of
the organization. According to Cockerell, “the term brand
usually conjures up a logo or a slogan. In reality, your peo-
ple are your brand. No matter how good your products and
services are, you can’t achieve true excellence unless you
attract great people, develop great people, and keep great
people.” Once a manager learns this, the actual process of
managing becomes easier. It may take a longer period of
time to hire the right people, but ultimately it’s worth it.
Third, Cockerell puts an emphasis on training. “Great
leaders give their people effective, thorough, consistent
training,” he said, “along with ample opportunities to keep
on learning.” It’s not just on-the-job training, but also train-
ing in the organization’s culture, understanding the values
of the company as well as the mission statement, and
having a firm grasp of customer service. “Don’t just teach
them how to do their jobs,” Cockerell added, “instill in
them a higher sense of purpose. That’s what motivates
them to truly excel.”
Ineffective processes, on the other han
and hassles lead to alienated customer
employees.”
Finally, Cockerell insists that manag
embodiment of a great leader in order to
motivated. “Like it or not,” he said, “lead
watched, evaluated, and emulated, so tl
like impeccable professionals at all time
als are not only competent, they persor
nity, and reliability every minute of the
this reason, Cockerell says that it is imp
character and know one’s values. “Grea
“know what they stand for, and they co
values to their people. They are always
right thing.”1
e:
tance
nbers
s for
Fourth, the manager is responsible for finding and
eliminating anything that gets in the way of employees’
ability to do their jobs. Whether it is easy-to-understand
ers
processes or being a good problem solver, successful
THE MOTIVATION CHA
Lee Cockerell, executive vice pres
for Walt Disney Company, focuses
that motivate employees. Accordi
Case, Cockerell motivates employ
that every employee is important,
are part of the brand, providing tra
hassles, and setting the example
follow. The material in this chapte
managers are always looking for employee impediments.
“Effective processes make routine things run smoothly,”
Cockerell said, “which frees employees to do the extra
things that turn a good business into a great business.
it

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