Biomedical Engineering

| April 27, 2015

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                                                              Active Learning partners:

Person on your left Person on your right
April 16th
April 23rd

IMPORTANT NOTE: please remember that you should not share any electronic files with classmates. This includes not sharing the SolidWorks files or technical drawings that you will be working on in this assignment. You can verbally ask your classmate about how to do something, but you should not accept or give an electronic copy of a SolidWorks file, drawing, etc.

 

Summary of design process:

 

  1. In this step of the process, you will design the physical casing for the device and test-strip layout. Using SolidWorks, design the case for your blood glucose meter (the part users would hold when using the device) and the test-strip that the user will place the drop of blood on (this is where your enzyme is).

 

  1. a) Design the bottom of the case. This should include the circuit board that includes your working electrode, resistor, op-amp, battery, and “Arduino”-style output measurement chip (size doesn’t have to match a real Arduino which are larger than you need). You do not need to put those details on your circuit board (just make it big enough) EXCEPT you need to specify the location of your working electrode contact because it MUST assemble correctly with the working electrode on the test strip. Also include a position for the battery needed to power the op-amp (look up specs for the battery you chose back in Assignment #6 to see how big that battery is). Make sure the position is the right size and dimensions for your battery.

 

[Include the “Technical Drawing” of part here – see attached information about how to create the technical drawing for your part]

 

  1. b) Design the top of the case. This should include a location for the LCD display to read out. It should also mate with the bottom of the case.

 

[Include the “Technical Drawing” of part here – see attached information about how to create the technical drawing for your part]

 

  1. c) Design the test-strip. This should include the working electrode (where your enzyme is). It should also include a mechanism for getting the blood spread on the working electrode properly (can be a capillary tube running from the side, or a defined dimension opening on the top of the strip). The test-strip needs to “assemble” properly with the rest of your device by inserting into a hole in the case so that the working electrode on the test-strip assembles by matching up with the contact for the working electrode on your circuit board.

 

[Include the “Technical Drawing” of part here – see attached information about how to create the technical drawing for your part]

 

  1. d) “Assemble” these three pieces together so that the top of the case mates with the bottom of the case and so that the working electrode on the test strip mates with the contact for the working electrode on the device’s circuit.

 

[Include the “Technical Drawing” of your final assembly here – see attached information about how to create the technical drawing for your assembly]

 

  1. Make a simplified business plan for manufacturing and selling your device.
  2. a) Estimate the costs of each of your components required per device (including but not limited to: resistor, op-amp, battery, voltage sensing “arduino”, LCD display, casing material, etc) and test-strip (including but not limited to: enzyme, cellulose acetate, Nafion, other chemicals needed for making working electrode, test strip backing material, etc.).

 

[Include list with itemized costs per measurement device here]

 

[Include list with itemized costs per test-strip here]

 

  1. b) Estimate the cost of capital equipment needed to make each device or test strip. Make sure to keep in mind the total number of users you estimate will own your device and how many test strips they’ll need to buy per month. Scale your equipment needs to match that production capacity. Amortize by dividing cost of the items by 10 years to calculate an amount per year to count against your profits. Include cost of real estate for housing your manufacturing facility and corporate offices here (or include in 2a if you will be renting rather than buying the property).

 

[Include cost of equipment with itemized costs here]

 

  1. c) Estimate the time you will need to pay workers to:

(1) manufacture a single device

(2) perform your calibration tests (each batch of test-strips requires its own calibration)

(3) perform all quality control and regulatory documentation

(4-∞) any other labor costs you will need to pay including marketing, legal, customer service, etc.

Multiply each by an estimate of $30/hr

 

[Include the annual cost of each of these items here (at $30/hr)]

 

  1. d) Estimate the selling price (manufacturer’s whole-sale price) for your device and test strips (remember the 1-3-9 rule, which says that the retail selling price is 3 times the manufacturer’s whole-sale price, which is 3 times the manufacturer’s cost). Multiply by number of devices and test strips you expect to sell each year. Add these together to get your annual sales.

 

[Include the information for these items here]

 

  1. e) Calculate the following:

(1) Capital required: add up all parts needed for the first year of production, cost of all equipment (not amortized), and cost of all labor needed for the first year of production.

(2) Annual expenses: add up all parts needed for the first year of production, cost of all equipment (amortized), and cost of all labor needed for the first year of production.

(3) Annual revenue: add up revenue from sales of devices and test strips

(4) Annual profits: subtract annual expenses from annual revenue.

 

[Include the information for these items here]

 

 

  1. Most likely, the simplified business plan you just created says that you will make millions of dollars in profits during your first year in business. That never happens in the biomedical industry. The typical biomedical start-up requires a minimum of approximately $50,000,000 in start-up costs and a minimum of about 5 years before ever turning a profit.

 

Identify as many omissions and underestimates you can find in your above business plan. List them here with a brief (~ a sentence) description and how much difference in your plan this is likely to make (dollar amount difference in expense or income).

 

[Include list here]

 

 

 

 

Instructions for turning in Assignment 7:

 

  1. Upload your worksheet in either Word or PDF format to Blackboard (due on or before 8:00 AM, Monday, April 27th)

 

  1. At the beginning of class on April 30th: Turn in a hard copy of the worksheet (PDF or Word format) AND a copy of the pages in your notebook for this assignment.

 

Assignment 7 – Tutorial Solidworks

Prior to constructing your device, it is highly recommended that you finalize the device design in your logbook. The finalized sketch of your device should represent the shape of your assembled device, and the sub parts of your device with appropriate dimensions. If you are confused about how to draw a technical drawing, please refer to the “Assignment7_TechnicalDrawing.pdf” on blackboard.

For this assignment, you don’t have to go into every single detail of your device. The goal for this assignment is to provide you with the knowledge of real world engineering and the design process as it relates to designing the physical shape of your prototype.

Once you have finalized your schematic in your logbook, use SolidWorks to construct the parts of the device. Here are a few basic guidelines that might be helpful:

  • Once SolidWorks is open, the default units will be in inches. If you designed your device in centimeters or any other metric unit, please change the units by going into tools > options > document properties > units, and select the appropriate measuring system.
  • Begin sketching by clicking on the sketch option and then selecting the most appropriate plane to sketch your device in (top, front or side plane) and different shapes that are available to you.
  • Dimension your sketch using the smart dimension tool on SolidWorks and make sure your sketch is completely defined, which is indicated by a black outline of your sketch, before proceeding to the next step.
  • Click the green check mark (top right corner in the sketch area) to exit sketch and click on the Extrude base/boss option to create a 3D image of your sketch.
  • This will generate a solid object, and there are many ways to make your object hollow. One-way is to sketch on the solid part and using the Extrude cut option and setting the depth of the cut. Another option is, using the Shell This will also allow your to accomplish the same task with the hassle of generating a sketch. This option will make your whole part hollow.
  • Once done, if you want to add additional features, follow the same instructions and sketch accordingly on your part.
  • Once done with your part, in order to generate the technical drawing for your part, first save your part and click on the new option and select
  • Now select the B landscape option and check on display sheet format and click ok.
  • Adjust your units and select view layout tab and select model view and double click on the part. Place the object on the sheet and then generate your appropriate views of your object (need the front, side, top and isometric view of the object). Make sure you have added the appropriate dimensions on your sketches by using insert > model items > entire model (in dropdown menu) > select all. If confused please check this video out (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpwvqZ8TJao).
  • Follow the instructions above to generate your other parts and once done click on new > assembly > browse for parts to select the parts being assembled > select mate and orient the parts appropriately. If confused use the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=au8Vdnw-XyU. You can also refer to “Lesson Two” on the SolidWorks Tutorial webpage.

The following instructions are basic features that can help you construct your device. You are not limited to the use of these features. If you know of a better way to construct the part you wish to design, go for it. Creativity is encouraged and there are various resources online that you could utilize in order to help you succeed and learn SolidWorks.

 

Technical Drawing MEC1000 Spring 2006 Instructor: David Anderson Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 2 Topics • Drawing Views • Drawing Standards • Best Practices • Creating Drawings in SolidWorks Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 3 Drawing Views • Multi-View Projection – The Glass Box • Third Angle Projection • Two View Drawings • Lin e T y p e s • Section Views • Auxiliary Views • D e t ail Vie w s • Broken-Out Section Views • Partial Views, Cropped Views Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 4 Drawing Views – Multiview Projection • A view of an object is know technically as a projection • A projection is a view conceived to be drawn or projected on to a plane, known as the plane of projection • Multiview or orthographic projection is a system of views of an object formed by projectors from the object perpendicular to the desired plane of projection. Huh? Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 5 Drawing Views – Multiview Projection • The projection of an object. • Perpendicular lines or projectors are drawn from all points on the edges or contours of the object to the plane of projection. • Shown below is the projection of an object onto the frontal plane. Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 6 Drawing Views – Planes of projection likewise, • the top view is projected onto the horizontal plane • the side view is projected onto the profile plane Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 7 Multiview Projection – The Glass Box • Placing parallel planes to the principal planes forms a glass box (always observed from outside the box) • To show views of a 3D object on a 2D piece of paper, it is necessary to unfold the planes such that they lie in the same plane • All planes except t he rear plane are hinged to the frontal plane, which is hinged to the left-side plane Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 8 Multiview Projection – The Glass Box • By unfolding the box, six views of the object are possible. Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 9 Drawing Views – Third Angle Projection Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 10 Multiview Projection – Proper number of Views • It may not, be necessary to show all six views to completely describe the object. • In fact, the minimum number of views is preferable. • How many views are necessary to completely describe this plate? • 1? • 2? • 3? • 4? Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 11 Multiview Projection – Two View Drawings • The answer is 2! Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 12 Drawing Views – Sectional Views • We have covered the basic method of representing an object by projecting views. This allows us to see the external features of an object. • Often times it is necessary to view the internal features, this is accomplished b y slicing through the obj e c t and produci ng a sectional or section view Section view is always placed BEHIN D arrows Section Line Alw ays a phantom line type Object being sectioned View Arrow With Label Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 13 Drawing Views – Sectional Views Sectional views are extremely useful in minimizing the number of projected views. How many views does this object require? Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 14 Drawing Views – Sectional Views Section views provide clear and unambiguous representation of internal features Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 15 Drawing Views – Sectional Views Section views can reduced the number of views of many axisymmetric parts to a single view Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 16 Drawing Views – Auxiliary Views • Inclined planes and oblique (neither parallel nor perpendicular) lines appear foreshortened when projected to the principle planes of projection. • To obtain a true size view, auxiliary views are created using similar techniques as for creating standard views, unfolding about an axis… Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 17 Drawing Views – Detail Views When there is a great disparity between feature size, or views are overcrowded with dimensions, a detail vie w can be used to capture t he feature(s) of interest and display them in a removed view of greater scale. Detail View Designated by an Enclosed circl e and labled. Labeled and scale noted Rem ove d And scaled Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 18 Drawing Views – Broken-Out Section Broken-out Section views are essentially partial section views with out the section arrow. Often times they are used to expose a feature of interest while eliminating the need to create a nother view. Broken out Section – No label necess ary What is wrong with this drawing? The auxilary view is NOT behind The view arrows! Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 19 Drawing Views – Partial Views Partial views are removed views and are established in a similar manner as section views, that is they require view arrows to establish viewing direction. However, they do not have to section an entire object, rather can simply display a partial view of a projection at a larger scale if desired. Partial Section Line w/Labled Arrows R emov ed partial section view L abled and scale n oted What is wrong with this drawing? Nothing! Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 20 Drawing Views – Cropped Views Cropped views reduce the size of a view such that only necessary information is display ed. Cropped views also maximize t he s heet area by reducing view size. Crop Are Cropped Vi a ew Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 21 Drawing Standards • ASME responsible for mechanical drawing standards • Sheet Formats • Line Types • Dimensioning Rules and Schemes Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 22 Drawing Standards – ASME • There e xists stand ards and p ractices for creating technical drawings of mechanical parts and assemblies. The governing agency responsible for setting the standards is ASME. There are a number of documents published by ASME that cover various aspects of mechanical drawings, here are a few of them… • ASME Y14.100 -2004 Engineering Drawing Practices • ASME Y14.4M – 1989 Pictorial Drawing • ASME Y14.3M – Multi and Sectional View Drawings • ASME Y14.1 – 1995 Decimal Inch Drawing Sheet Size and Format • ASME Y14.5M – 1994 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing • ASME Y14.13M – 1981 Mechanical Spring Representation • It is important to follow these standards to ensure your drawings are interpreted correctly by others. • Always consult the standard when it doubt! Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 23 Drawing Standards – Sheet Formats • There exist standardized sheet formats for creating engineering drawings. • American National Standard • A – 8.5” x 11” • B – 11” x 17” • C – 17” x 22” • D – 22” x 34” • E – 34” x 44” • International Standard ISO (mm) • A4 – 210 x 297 • A3 – 297 x 420 • A2 – 420 x 594 • A1 – 594 x 841 • A0 – 841 x 1189 Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 24 Drawing Standards – Sheet Format Example C-Size R evision Block Title Bloc k Notes Zone Identifiers Border This is zone “C4” Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 25 Drawing Standards – Sheet Formats R evision Block Drawing Notes TEXT IS ALL CAPS! NO L OWE R CASE. Tolerance Block Company Name Part Name WIDGET Default Tolerance Default Surface Finis h Engr Info Part # Scale Part Re v # of Shts Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 26 Drawing Standards – Line Types • There exist many line types here are but a few… Visible Line Hidden Line Section Line Center Line Dim & Extension Leaders Cuttin g Plane Viewing Plane Center M a r k Leaders Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 27 Drawing Standards – Dimensions • There exist a number of dimension types • Lin e a r • Coordinate Dimensions • Coordinate witho
ut dimension lines (Ordinate) • Angular • Radial/Diametrical • Tabular • Dimension Placement Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 28 Drawing Standards – Coordinate Are these 2 drawings the same?YES! Which one w ould y o u r ather detail ? Which one would you rather mak e ? Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 29 Drawing Standards – Coordinate Are these 2 drawings the same? NO! The hole-to-tolerance increases The hole to edge tolerance is constant The hole-to-tolerance is constant The hole to edge tolerance increases Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 30 Drawing Standards – Ordinate Are these 2 drawings the same?YES! Which one w ould y o u r ather detail ? Which one would you rather mak e ? Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 31 Drawing Standards – Proper Dimension Placement Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 32 Drawing Standards – Dimensioning Rules 1. All CAPS! 2. All D ecimals 3. Select a front view that best describes the part 4. Remove hi d den lines alway s, unless absolutely necessary 5. Do not dupli cate dimensions 6. D o not dim e n sion to hidd e n lines 7. Place dims betwe en views if possible 8. No dim s all owed o n body of part. Offset .38” in c h fro m object o utline 9. Place all dims for feature in one view if possible 10. Dim lines cannot cro s s dim lines 11. Dim lines should not cross extension lines 12. Extensi on lines can cross extension lines 13. Center marks in view(s) o nly where feature is dimensioned only 14. Centerlines in view(s) where feature is dimensi oned Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 33 Drawing Standards – Bolt Holes Poor practice, dims should all be horizontal Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 34 Drawing Standards – Hole Tables Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 35 Drawing Standards – Hole Callouts Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 36 Drawing Standards – Threaded Hole Callouts Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 37 Drawing Standards – Misc Callouts Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 38 Best Practices/Basic Rules 1. All CAPS! 2. All Deci m als 3. Select a front view t hat best describes the part 4. Remove hidden lines unless absolutely necessary to describe the shape of the object 5. Consid er datum s and dim ensioning s che m e based on 1. Feature relation s hip 2. Manufacturability and inspection 3. Reduce math for machinist 6. Do not duplicate dimensions, use reference dims if neces sary to d u plicate 7. Do not dimension to hidden lines 8. Place dims between views if possible 9. No dims o n body of part. Offset .38” inch fro m object outli n e 10. Place all dims for same feature in o ne view if possible 11. Dim lines cannot cross dim lines 12. Dim lines sho uld not cross extension lines 13. Extension lines can cross e xtension lines 14. Use center marks in view(s) o nly w here feature i s dimen sione d 15. Use centerlines an d center marks i n view s o nly i f feature i s being dimensione d or referenced oth erwi s e omit. 16. When multiples of the same feature exists i n a view, dimen sion o nly o n e of the features a nd lable the dim as “Number X ” DIM meani n g that the feature exi s t s in that view“Number” times. For example, “4X .250 ” implies that i n the view, t here exists 4 like dimensions for the dimen sion ed feature 17. Minimize use of centerlines betw e en hole s e tc, they add little value and clutter the object bei ng drawn. Spring 2006 MEC1000 Technical Drawing – D. Anderson 39 SolidWorks Custom Properties DEMO!

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