Anne Arundel Community College Sex Education Forcible Sexual Behavior Analysis Please see the attached assignment labeled 1. Forceable sexual behavior, and

Anne Arundel Community College Sex Education Forcible Sexual Behavior Analysis Please see the attached assignment labeled 1. Forceable sexual behavior, and 2. Sexual Orientation. Read them thoroughly and answer the question contained in them. Use the attached PowerPoint to help answer the questions. Let me know if you have any questions FORCIBLE SEXUAL BEHAVIORS
3RD ASSIGNMENT
Assignment: With this assignment you are to do the following:
This assignment has to do with Module #5, “Sexual Deviancy and Disease.”
Question: It is often said that rape is more a crime of power than sex! Do you believe this?
Why, why not?
Question: List and discuss 3 ways that someone can sexually harass another person, whether it
is in a school or work setting?
You can find source material in either of the textbooks, or you might just go online and search
material on the questions.




Go into Blackboard,
Click on Modules,
Click on Module #5 “Sexual Deviancy and Disease”
Click on Chapter 14, PowerPoint “Forcible Sexual Behaviors.”
As always, please write the question before you answer so that I will know what question the
answer is connected to.
SEXUAL ORIENTATION
3RD ASSIGNMENT
Assignment: With this assignment you are to do the following:
This assignment addresses Module #4, “Sexual Orientation.”





Go into our course in Blackboard,
Click on Modules,
Click on Module #4 “Sexuality in Adulthood”
Click on PowerPoint Chapter 10 “Sexual Orientation”
Review the slides and answer the following questions.
Question: In the chapter, the author revealed and described the 2 theories of sexual
orientation. One was biological, the other psychological. Read and review both. Then answer
by describing both and select which one you think is most plausible (makes the most sense)?
Why, why not? Why do you think this (you can use factual and personal information to support
your view).
You can find source material in either of the textbooks, or you might just go online and search
for material there.
As always, please write the question before you answer so that I will know what question
you’re answering.
Chapter 10
SEXUAL ORIENTATION
CHAPTER OBJECTIVES
1) Define sexual orientation, including
heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality.
Discuss the validity of the Kinsey continuum.
2) Compare and contrast the theories of sexual
orientation.
3) Discuss homosexual life, including the
challenges specific to homosexuality.
4) Discuss social issues that affect homosexuals.
SEXUAL ORIENTATION
• Sexual Orientation refers to one’s erotic,
romantic, and affectional attraction to the same
gender, to other genders, or to both.
– Heterosexual refers to people whose primary erotic,
romantic, and affectional attraction is toward members of
the other gender.
– Homosexual refers to people whose primary erotic ,
romantic, and affectional attraction is toward members of
one’s own gender.
– Bisexual refers to people whose erotic, romantic, and
affectional attraction is toward both genders
KINSEY CONTINUUM
The Kinsey continuum refers only to homosexual or heterosexual behavior.
SEXUAL ORIENTATION
• Bisexuality
– 9% of single 30-year-old women
– 16% of single 30-year-old men
• Asexuality
– Refers to the absence of sexual attraction
– 1% of the population or 4.5 million people
• Homosexuality in the population
– 2.3% of the population (18-44 years of age)
• Heterosexuality in the population
– 90+ percent of the population
IN OTHERS’ WORDS…
• “There’s this illusion that homosexuals have sex and
heterosexuals fall in love. That is completely untrue.
Everybody wants to be loved.”
—Boy George
• “It seems that the real clue to your sex-orientation
lies in your romantic feelings, rather than your
sexual feelings. If you are really gay, you are able to
fall in love with a man, not just enjoy having sex
with him.”
—Christopher Underwood
THEORIES OF SEXUAL ORIENTATION
• Biological theories
• Two landmark studies
– Genetic theory
– LeVay
– Hormonal theory
– Bailey & Pillard
• Psychological theories
– Psychoanalytic theory
– Learned behavior theory
• Integrated theories
• School environment
HOMOSEXUAL LIFE

The social scene and homosexuals
– In the U.S. the homosexual subculture is centered on
private clubs, homosexual bars, and homophile
organizations.
– Impersonal nature of sexual activity (e.g. bathroom
stalls)
• Social issues and homosexuals
– The Internet and homosexuality
– Homosexuals as parents
– The military’s “Don’t ask; don’t tell” policy
– Homosexuality and fashion
– MTV’s gay cable TV channel called Logo
HOMOSEXUAL LIFE
Issues related to religion and morality


Religious concerns about homosexuality include:
• Same gender activity is something that should be
criminilized.
• Homosexuality is sinful and immoral, no matter what
the relationship.
• Homosexuality is hated by God.
• Homosexuality is indicative of mental illness.
• Homosexuality is a choice that people make.
• Homosexuality is changeable through repentance and
being saved.
• Homosexuality is abnormal and unnatural for everyone.
• Same-sex marriage is an extreme danger to society.
HOMOSEXUAL LIFE

Homophobia
– An irrational fear of homosexuality in others, a fear
of homosexual feeling within oneself, or an
unhappiness with one’s own homosexuality.
• Brief Description of the Sex Belief System (2009)
1) Abomination
2) Change is expected
3) Celibacy is expected
4) Marginally acceptable
5) Equality
6) Liberation
HOMOSEXUAL LIFE

Coming out
– One’s acceptance of the homosexual orientation and
making it public
– Family support is an important factor in coming out.
• The gay rights movement
– Gay and lesbian organizations can help gays deal
with the stresses experienced as a result of their
sexual preference.
– The Internet’s role in coming out
HOMOSEXUAL LIFE

Legal Rights
– Key issues

Should lesbian and gay
couples be allowed to marry?

Should lesbian and gay
couples be afforded the same
legal benefits as heterosexual
couples?

Should lesbian and gay
couples be allowed to adopt?

How do we protect against
gender identity and sexual
orientation discrimination in
the workplace?
© Alvaro Pantoja/ShutterStock, Inc.
IN OTHERS’ WORDS…
• “If homosexuality is inherited, shouldn’t it
have died out by now?”
– George Booth (August 1993, New Yorker
magazine)
DISCUSSION
• What defines a person’s sexual orientation? Is sexual
orientation constant throughout life, or can it change
over time?
• Describe the theories of the causes of sexual
orientation and whether or not research supports
theoretical claims.
• Compare and contrast the homosexual lifestyle with
the heterosexual lifestyle.
• What are the social issues surrounding
homosexuality? How do such issues adversely affect
homosexuals?
Chapter 14
FORCIBLE SEXUAL BEHAVIORS
CHAPTER OBJECTIVES
1) Differentiate between rape, statutory rape, stranger
rape, and date (acquaintance) rape. Discuss what
makes someone commit a rape. Discuss the myths
surrounding rape.
2) Discuss pedophilia, including the profile of the
pedophiliac, incidence and effects of pedophilia, and
prevention.
3) Describe the incidences of incest and the typical
effects of incest on its victims.
4) Summarize important information about violence
within marriage, including marital rape and domestic
abuse.
5) Discuss sexual harassment in the workplace, in
schools, on campus, and in the military, and indicate
what can be done to prevent and deal with it.
IN OTHERS’ WORDS…
“Men are taught to apologize for their weakness,
women for their strengths.”
—Lois Wyse
SEXUAL VIOLENCE
• Sexual assault and abuse refers to any sexual
activity that is nonconsensual. It can be verbal, visual,
or anything that forces a person to join in unwanted
sexual contact or attention.






Inappropriate touching
Vaginal, anal, or oral penetration
Sexual intercourse after you say no
Rape
Attempted rape
Child molestation
SEXUAL VIOLENCE
RAPE
Rape is forcible sexual intercourse with a person who
does not give consent. Forms of rape, include
statutory rape, stranger rape, as well as
acquaintance rape.
• Rape myths
– “Women lead men on and therefore deserve to be
raped.”
– This statement is false!
• Society and rape
– Rape remains one of the most underreported crimes
– How can I protect myself from being sexually
assaulted?
RAPE
• The rapist
– Most rapists rape to be aggressive, to wield their
power, or to degrade their victim.
– Varying theories as to the nature of rape exist.
• Anger rapist
• The power exploitative rapist
• The power reassurance rapist
• The sadist rapist
• Date rape or acquaintance rape
• Ways to help prevent acquaintance rape
RAPE
• Situational model of coercive sexual behavior
RAPE
• Date-rape drugs
– Can be slipped into your drink; have no color, smell or
taste
– Rohypnol
– GHB
– Ketamine hydrochloride
© Liquid Library
© SuperStock/Alamy Images
RAPE
• The incidence of sexual assault
– Statistics are unreliable.
– However, they can still give us a general picture of
what is happening.
• 1 in 6 women and 1 in 33 men in the U.S. have
been victims of rape or attempted rape.
• 80% of victims knew their perpetrators.
• Consequences of rape
– Rape trauma syndrome
– Fear of intimacy
– Lower self-esteem
RAPE
• Rape of males
– Much of the information about rape concerns
females
– Males can be the victims of rape as well
• Male rape in prison
• Male rape by other males outside of prison
• Male rape by females
– After more than four decades of research, it is still
unclear how much rape and sexually violent
activity occurs in prisons and jails.
RAPE
• Social response to rape
– Sexual assault crisis centers
– Workshops
– Shelters
– Greater recognition of the need for services and
prevention
– Changes in law enforcement personnel
• Training to become more sensitive
• More female officers
– Better cooperation with medical and support
personnel
– Guidelines for handling survivors of sexual assault
PEDOPHILIA
Pedophilia refers to sexual behavior in which a child is
the sexual object.
• The pedophiliac
– The diagnostic criteria for pedophilia are:
1) Over a period of at least six months, recurrent,
intense sexually arousing fantasies, urges, or
behaviors involving a prepubescent child or children
2) The person has acted on these sexual urges
3) The person is at least 16 years of age and at least 5
years older than the child or children
• Incidence of pedophilia
– Statistics do not differentiate between between pedophilia
and child sexual abuse
– 44% of sexual assault/rape victims are under the age of 18
PEDOPHILIA
• Online pedophilia
– As the Internet has developed, so have opportunities
for Internet-related crimes such as pedophilia
– Pedophiles have been know to use the Internet in at
least two different ways
• Trust-based seductive model
• Direct sexual model
– Nationwide arrests
• 644 arrests in the year 2000
• 3,100 arrests in the year 2005
PEDOPHILIA
• The effects of pedophilia
– Initial effects of sexual abuse include fear, anxiety,
depression, anger, aggression, and sexually inappropriate
behavior. Long term affects include low self-esteem, etc.
– Exposure to childhood sexual abuse seems to be associated
with increased rates of sexual risk-taking behaviors and
sexual revictimization during adolescence.
• Prevention
– Education programs designed to teach children and adults
– Educators, parents, and other adults need to learn to
recognize physical and behavioral changes indicative of
sexual abuse
– The Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act (2006)
INCEST
• Incest is sexual behavior between relatives who are
too closely related to be married.
• Types of incest
– Father-daughter incest is most commonly reported
– Brother-sister incest
– Mother-child incest
• Statistics
– 95% of the offenders are male and the family structure was
strongly patriarchal
• Effects
– Long term consequences include: posttraumatic stress
disorder, cognitive disorders, emotional distress, impaired
sense of self, avoidance, and health problems
RELATIONSHIP ABUSE
• Marital rape
– As recently as 1976 no husband could be charged with
raping his wife
– Today it is a crime in all 50 states
– Underreported for a variety of reasons
• Loyalty to husband/privacy of family
• Unwillingness to accept their own victimization
• Reluctance to label the experience “rape”
• Misunderstanding about a woman’s role in marriage
and marital responsibilities
• Intimate partner violence
– Intimate partners commit 40% – 70% of homicides of
women worldwide
– 1 in 3 women have been beaten worldwide
IN OTHERS’ WORDS…
• “Nobody can make you feel inferior without your
consent.”
—Eleanor Roosevelt
SEXUAL HARASSMENT
• Sexual harassment refers to unwelcome verbal,
physical, or sexual conduct that has the effect of
creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive
environment.
• Sexual harassment in schools
– Verbal and physical harassment begin in elementary school
• Sexual harassment on campus
– Nearly two-thirds of college students experience some
type of sexual harassment
• Sexual harassment and the military
• Reactions to sexual harassment
DISCUSSION
• What are the different categories of rape? Who are
the rapists in these categories? What are the effects
on the victims?
• What effects does child abuse have on its survivors?
• Describe the type of person the commits incest.
• Explain why someone in an abusive marriage stays
in the relationship. Can one be absolutely sure when a
spouse should leave? Or is every situation different?
• In what ways is sexual harassment the same and
different in the work-place, in schools, in colleges,
and in the military? In the intent of harassment the
same in each situation?

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