12-15 page research paper on the Tampa International Airport in APA. Have template, abstract and requirements attached Airports1.  The airport I chose was

12-15 page research paper on the Tampa International Airport in APA. Have template, abstract and requirements attached Airports1.  The airport I chose was the Tampa International AIrport in Florida  

Select a specific civil airport located anywhere in the world and serving commercial airlines, then:

a.Describe briefly the airport and its owner/operator, airlines serving the airport, and the city, cities or region served by the airport.

b.Identify the governmental agency or authority or private enterprise responsible for providing security screening of passengers and cargo at the airport.

c.Identify government legal actions taken there to:i.protect the surrounding airspace from obstruction by obstacles,ii.assure that land uses surrounding the airport are compatible with aircraft noise,iii.establish runway use preferences, approach and departure paths to minimize aircraft noise impact on surrounding communities.

d.Identify the specific government agency or authority that took each such action.

e.Identify the source and type of government legal powers relied on to accomplish each of these actions.

f.Include images illustrating the airport and vicinity relating to those specific actions.g.Identify and briefly describe all airline accidents that have occurred at or in the vicinity of that airport since 1/01/2000, including the probable cause of each.

h.Identify current airport noise and safety issues that remain of concern to the community and any current activity to address those issues.i.Analyze whether the airport’s level of activity and forecast air traffic demand appear sustainable at the present location for the long term, clearly explaining your reasoning. 1

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How to Delete Comments in this Template
Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Before proceeding, save a copy of this template with comments to use as a reference while you write your papers.

To create a “clean” template for your papers, you must delete all comments like this. Before doing that, first save the template with a new document name. Then, simply type over the sample text, deleting any remaining sample text; be sure to also delete the sample table & figure at the end of this template.

To delete the comments using MS Word, first left click on any pink highlighted text in the template. Select Review along the top banner, then left click on the Delete dropdown tab. Finally, select Delete All Comments in Document.

Title Page Notes
Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: The ERAU College of Aeronautics has adopted the APA Manual (7th ed.) Student Paper Required Elements for all papers in its undergraduate and graduate courses.

APA Student Paper Elements do not include a running head; see APA Manual (7th ed.), p. 30, Sect. 2.2.

Insert page numbers on all pages; begin with 1 for the title page (top right corner of each page).

Use “title case” capitalization for your paper’s title: Capitalize the first letter of all significant words, words containing four or more letters, and acronyms; use lower case for lesser words containing three letters or less. Capitalize the first word of the title, and the first word following a colon, hyphen, or period/question mark in the title. APA Manual (7th ed.), p. 167, Sect. 6.17.

Identify the ERAU Worldwide College of your degree’s affiliation (e.g., College of Aeronautics, College of Business, College of Arts and Sciences).

Date included on the student paper title page is the paper’s due date.

If the course instructor does not hold a doctoral degree, use Mr./Ms., or you may begin with the instructor’s full name followed by faculty rank, e.g., Kimberly A. Instructor, Assistant Professor.

San Francisco International Airport: Assessing a Major Aviation Hub

Joe B. Student
College of Aeronautics, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
ASCI 645: Airport Operations and Management
Dr. Kimberly A. Instructor
May 3, 2020

Abstract Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Refer to the course assignment instructions to determine if an abstract is required. Typically, shorter written assignments do not require an abstract and keywords. If an abstract is required, follow it with Keywords: (italicized), first line indented. However, the actual keywords that follow are not italicized and, unless proper nouns or acronyms, the keywords are not capitalized. Do not include a period after the last keyword.
An abstract is typically a maximum of 250 words written in a single paragraph; the first line is not indented. Describe the purpose of your paper, identifying the major aspects of your research and significant findings. Do not included quoted material, and avoid including data, facts, etc., from sources that would require citations. The abstract is a quick look for your readers, allowing them to determine if it contains something of interest or material that could help them in their research. See APA Manual (7th ed.), Chapter 2, p. 38, Sect. 2.9, for more about abstracts.
Keywords: words, phrases, and/or acronyms that describe the most important aspects of your paper

San Francisco International Airport: Assessing a Major Aviation Hub Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Include the full title of your paper, bold and centered, at the top of the first page of text.

Select 1” margins on all four sides of each page; indent the first line of each new paragraph 0.5”. Double space all lines of text using one of three APA-recommended fonts: 12-point Times New Roman (most common), 11-point Calibri, or 11-point Arial; use the same font for page numbers.
Introduce your paper in the first paragraph(s) of text. Do
not
include a heading for the introduction section; the text of the introduction immediately follows the title above it – see APA Manual (7th ed.), Chapter 2, p. 47, Sect. 2.27. Depending upon the length of the paper, one to three paragraphs should be an adequate introduction; however, several paragraphs may be more appropriate for extensive, comprehensive research. More extensive introductions should include subsections identified with subheadings. An introduction paragraph does not serve the same purpose of an abstract, nor is it the same as your conclusion/summary section. For more information about introductions see APA Manual (7th ed.), Chapter 3, Sect. 3.4.

SFO History Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Level 1 heading format; see APA Manual (7th ed.), p. 48, Table 2.3

There are significant changes to section headings format compared to the APA Manual (6th ed.)

Never insert a section/subsection heading with only the heading appearing at the bottom a page (without at least one line of text on the same page). Force a heading appearing at the bottom of a page to the top of the next page using your keyboard’s Enter key. If using MS Word, you may also use the Insert – Pages – Page Break feature in the MS Word ribbon bar.

When finished, be sure to review the paper for extra lines or blank pages; all normal text in the paper must be double spaced. If you do not properly set up MS Word line format before you begin, you will very likely see triple spacing between paragraphs. This template should be formatted to permit you to simply type over everything with your text while retaining the required double-spacing format. Be sure to delete all notes appearing in this sample APA student paper template.
Include Level 1 headings, bold and centered, describing the focus of each major section in the paper. Level 1 headings follow title case heading: Capitalize all major words, all words containing four or more letters, acronyms, and the first word of the heading, even if a minor word (e.g., A, The, If, etc.).

SFO Economics and Finance

Notice this Level 1 heading contains two related subjects, so in the first paragraph(s) of
this section you would more broadly introduce the two related subjects together; see below for examples of Level 2 & Level 3 subheading formats.

Economics
Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: (Level 2 heading format)

Begin the first paragraph of this subsection here.

Ownership, Control, and Governance
Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: (Level 3 heading format)

See APA Manual (7th ed.), Chapter 2, p. 48, Table. 2.3, for format examples of all five levels of section headings and subheadings.

If including a subsection within a subsection, follow this heading format.

Financial Performance

Begin the first paragraph of this subsection here.

SFO Airline Strategies

Begin the introductory paragraph(s) of this section here.

Asia-Pacific Air Carriers

Begin the first paragraph of this subsection here.

U.S. Airline Hubs at SFO

Begin your first paragraph of this subsection here.

Airport Public Relations

Begin your introductory paragraph(s) of this section here.

Noise Abatement

Begin your first paragraph of this subsection here.

Aircraft and Ground Equipment Emissions

Begin your first paragraph of this subsection here.

Environmental Responsibility

Begin your first paragraph of this subsection here.

Clean Water

Begin your first paragraph of this subsection here.

Recycling

Begin your first paragraph of this subsection here.

Electric Vehicles

Begin your first paragraph of this subsection here.

Conclusion Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: or Summary
A conclusion presents a final overview of the research major findings, but more importantly, it describes the author’s key conclusions resulting from a thorough assessment of the research findings. On the other hand, a summary may be compared to a brief essay that presents and succinctly evaluates only the major findings of the research.

Tables and Figures Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Note: This section is included only for information purposes. A paper would not include a tables and figures section here; see below for location options to insert tables and figures.

Delete this entire Tables and Figures section from your paper.

Pages 12-13 include examples of a properly formatted table and figure. Do not simply include figures and tables without referring those reading your paper to each figure or table, e.g., “Figure 1 provides…”; or, include it in parentheses following an appropriate sentence, e.g., (see Figure 1). Do not write “see the table below”, or “refer to the figure on page 18.”
APA permits a few options for inserting figures and tables; the easiest is to include all figures and tables on separate pages
following the references list. If the figures/tables remain legible, more than one figure or table per page may be included on a single page. Align figures and tables with the left and top margins; if more than one figure/table is included on the same page, double space between them and align the successive figure(s)/table(s) against the left margin.
Rotate a large figure vertically if it would be distorted using a horizontal view; do not shrink it so much that it becomes difficult to read. Do not use figures that are blurry or illegible (e.g., print is too small to read) – if you cannot locate a legible copy, do not use it.
A figure is typically a photo or a copy of something, including a copy of a table from an outside source; a copied table would be inserted following the APA figure format. A table is typically created to exhibit data discovered in research/experiments, or data collected from outside sources being presented in tabulated form. See APA Manual (7th ed.), Chapter 7, for several examples of tables and figures.

Citation Examples Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Note: This section is included for information purposes only. A paper would not include a separate section containing citations. Students must include citations where required in the text of the paper.

Delete this entire Citation Examples section from your paper.
In addition to direct quotations, a citation is required for each sentence you create that includes facts, figures, data, others’ ideas or research findings, or specific/unique pieces of information (unless common knowledge, e.g., 50 U.S. states, water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit). Following are a few examples of in-text citations; their associated sources appear in the sample references list (page 13).
Consider varying your citation style; instead of simply including citations at the end of each sentence requiring a citation (a
parenthetical
citation), begin some sentences with the citation (a
narrative
citation).

Narrative Citation Examples

According to Cook and Billig (2017), an airline’s distribution system includes two avenues for potential customers to research and book flights without using a third party: the airline’s website or its call center. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: This sentence is not a direct quote; however, since it contains specific information presented in the Cook and Billig textbook, it must be cited.
Cook and Billig (2017) noted, “The many advantages of the H&S system make it the choice of all large U.S. carriers except Southwest and the predominant route system worldwide” (p. 67). Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Note the placement of the period: outside the end-parenthesis (not between the last word and the end-quotation mark).

Include a page number for direct quotes; use “pp.” for multiple pages, e.g., (pp. 67-68). For direct quotes from websites and webpages with no identified pages, include the paragraph number, for example (para. 12).
As United Airlines (2020a) describes, “The cleaning procedure for flights includes a thorough wipe down using an effective, high-grade disinfectant and multi-purpose cleaning of lavatories, galleys, tray tables, window shades and armrests” (para. 1). Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: If multiple sources have the same author and the same date, include a, b, etc., immediately following the year in the citation. If the source has no date, use (n.d.) for a single source, and (n.d.-a), (n.d.-b), etc., for multiple sources with the same author and no date. See the sample references list for more about this. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Again, note the placement of the period for a quotation, as well as the requirement to include a webpage paragraph number since this United Airlines webpage does not include page numbers.
United Airlines (2020b) offers a special flight experience, termed Premium Transcontinental Service, between San Francisco and Newark, San Francisco and Boston, and Los Angeles and Newark.
As explained by ERAU SpecialVFR (2016), airplanes are powered by at least one engine; aircraft engines are also known as powerplants in the aviation industry.
According to ERAU SpecialVFR (2016), “An airplane has an engine which is commonly referred to as a powerplant” (0:15). Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: This and the previous citation example are from a YouTube video produced by ERAU. This sentence is a direct quote from the video, so it must include the time stamp from the point where the quote begins in the video, i.e., 15 seconds into the video. If it began 1 hour 2 minutes 30 seconds into the video, it would be presented as (1:02:30).

Parenthetical Citation Examples Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Following, are parenthetical citations forms of the narrative citation examples provided above (in order).
An airline’s distribution system includes two avenues for potential customers to research and book flights without using a third party: the airline’s website or call center (Cook & Billig, 2017). Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Note the placement of the period: outside the end-parenthesis (not between the last word in the sentence and the parenthetical citation).

Use the ampersand, “&”, in a parenthetical citation of a two-author source; however, use “and” in a narrative citation (compare this parenthetical citation example to the first two narrative citation examples).

If a source has three or more authors, identify only the primary author’s last name followed by “et al.” (“and others”) in both parenthetical and narrative citations, e.g., (Belobaba et al., 2009).
“The many advantages of the H&S system make it the choice of all large U.S. carriers except Southwest and the predominant route system worldwide” (Cook & Billig, 2017, p. 67).
“The cleaning procedure for flights includes a thorough wipe down using an effective, high-grade disinfectant and multi-purpose cleaning of lavatories, galleys, tray tables, window shades and armrests” (United Airlines, 2020a, para. 1).
A special flight experience is available on select United Airlines flights; termed Premium Transcontinental Service, it is offered only on select flights between San Francisco and Newark, San Francisco and Boston, and Los Angeles and Newark (United Airlines, 2020b).
Airplanes are powered by at least one engine; aircraft engines are also known as powerplants in the aviation industry (ERAU SpecialVFR, 2016).
“An airplane has an engine which is commonly referred to as a powerplant” (ERAU SpecialVFR, 2016, 0:15).

Block Quotations

If a quotation contains 40 or more words, the entire quotation must be indented. To check the number of words in a specific area of text using MS Word, simply highlight the words and look to the bottom left corner of the screen. You should see the Word document page number identified, as well as the number of highlighted words.
With certain exceptions, do not use quotation marks for block quotations and, unlike citations in the shorter direct quotes above, the block quotation citation is placed outside the end-punctuation mark (following the period belonging to the last sentence in the block quotation). For example: Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Note the yellow highlighted quotation marks below. This is the exception of using quotation marks in a block quotation: If the block quotation contains in-text quoted material, place quotation marks around the quoted material included in the source being quoted.
Asked whether the virtual seat map is a tool to get passengers to buy a cushier seat, Jojo said that is not the primary goal, though “that might happen.”
“We do have a more segmented product right now,” Jojo said. “So for customers to understand the difference in those segments, so when they buy it they know what they bought, is really the most important thing.” (Gilberston, 2019, para. 9-10)
Alternatively, the block quotation may begin by introducing the author using the narrative citation format:
According to Gilbertson (2019),
Asked whether the virtual seat map is a tool to get passengers to buy a cushier seat, Jojo said that is not the primary goal, though “that might happen.”
“We do have a more segmented product right now,” Jojo said. “So for customers to understand the difference in those segments, so when they buy it they know what they bought, is really the most important thing.” (para. 9-10)
If your quotation contains fewer than 40 words (no block style required), and a quote within the quotation, use a single apostrophe to identify the quoted material within the quotation. For example,
According to Gilbertson (2019), “Asked whether the virtual seat map is a tool to get passengers to buy a cushier seat, Jojo said that is not the primary goal, though ‘that might happen’” (para. 9).

References Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Always begin the references list with the References heading placed at the top of a new page.

This sample references list contains examples of the sources used in the sample citations section above, as well as a few additional examples of source formats commonly used in student papers.

Note the bold type APA 7th ed. now requires for the references section heading.
Belobaba, P., Odoni, A., & Barnhart, C. (Eds.). (2009). The global airline industry. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Include (Ed.) – singular / (Eds.) – plural following name(s) of persons identified as editors. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Italicize publication titles and most titles/headings found on websites (see below for some exceptions).

Unlike your paper’s title, references list source titles use sentence case capitalization: Capitalize only the first word of the title, in addition to the first word following a colon, hyphen, or period/question mark in the title (regardless of the number of letters in the word).

Capitalize all proper nouns and acronyms in a references list source title, e.g., San Francisco International Airport, or SFO.
Burridge, T. (2020, April 17). Coronavirus: Who is still flying? BBC News. https://www.bbc.com/news/business-52319575 Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Include the online news source name (not italicized) following the italicized title of the webpage/article.
Cook, G. N., & Billig, B. G. (2017). Airline operations management. A management perspective. Routledge. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: If a source has multiple authors, list names in order of appearance in the publication, do not reorder them alphabetically.

List by last name followed by initial(s); do not include professional titles, e.g., Ph.D., Dr., military ranks.

Do include any suffixes, e.g., Jr., Sr., II, III. However, do not include suffixes or initials in in-text citations.
Davol, A. (2017). A new model for airport ground transportation: Transportation network companies at San Francisco International Airport. Journal of Airport Management, 11(2), 147-153. https://www-ingentaconnect-com.ezproxy.libproxy.db.erau.edu/content/hsp/cam/2017/00000011/00000002/art00005;jsessionid=dixqjo4o559o.x-ic-live-02 Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Journal entries: Do not italicize the journal article title; however, do italicize the name of the journal and the volume number, which is immediately followed without a space by an issue number in parentheses (not italicized). Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: See APA Manual (7th ed.), p. 317, item 3.

Do not include a URL without a DOI, or database name, if a journal, magazine, or newspaper article was accessed using an academic research database, or other protected database requiring a password to access the online database. For example, this URL can only be opened by someone having ERAU credentials to access its secure online sites.

NOTE: A double-strikethrough of the URL is included in this template for emphasis only. Do not include a URL with strikethrough; simply omit the URL.

ERAU SpecialVFR. (2016, September 9). Aircraft systems – 03 – engine [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIdXLMVP6VU&index=34&list=PLzW-Ub1FWeZzdOHQhNK0U0Ci1a-VRH8IO Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Insert Video in brackets (not italicized) following the video name/title. Include the online video website used, e.g., YouTube. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: A period is not included following a webpage URL in a references list source.
Federal Aviation Administration. (2020, March 19). Air traffic by the numbers. https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/by_the_numbers/ Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Spell out the full name of an organization in the references list source.

If a source that has a common acronym is cited more than once in the text of the paper, you may include the acronym in brackets in the first citation, then use only the acronym in additional citations that follow. For example, the first time it is cited use (Federal Aviation Administration [FAA], 2020), then (FAA, 2020) for successive citations of the same source. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff:
Except as noted below in the San Francisco International Airport source with no date, APA 7th ed. no longer includes the statement “Retrieved from…” preceding a webpage URL.
Gilbertson, D. (2019, October 25). Want a close-up view of your plane seat? United is adding 3D views during ticket booking. USA Today. https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/airline-news/2019/10/25/united-airlines-adding-3-d-views-seats-during-ticket-booking/2454781001/ Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Online or in-print newspaper/magazine article names/titles: Do not italicize or place inside quotation marks. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Italicize the online/in-print periodical name, e.g., USA Today.

San Francisco International Airport. (n.d.). To, from & around – Parking – At a glance. Retrieved April 17, 2020, from https://www.flysfo.com/to-from/parking Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: Use (n.d.) – no date – if a date, or at least a copyright year, is not available on the webpage; be sure to check the very bottom of the webpage (the typical location for a copyright statement). Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: If the webpage content is likely to change, or expected to be periodically updated, include a retrieval date statement preceding the webpage URL (regardless of the availability of a webpage date).

However, if the webpage content is not likely to change, even if the webpage has no date (n.d.), a retrieval date statement is not required.
United Airlines. (2020a).
COVID-19: What we’re doing to keep customers and employees safe – Deliver industry-leading cleanliness. https://hub.united.com/united-coronavirus-covid19-safety-update-2645397564.html Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: This United Airlines webpage, and the following United webpage, have the same 2020 copyright year. To distinguish between sources in in-text citations with the same year, APA adds letters immediately following the year, e.g., (2020a) and (2020b). In the references list the sources are ordered alphabetically by their titles, e.g., COVID-19… alphabetically precedes Premium…
United Airlines. (2020b). Premium transcontinental service. https://www.united.com/ual/en/us/fly/travel/inflight/premium-services.html Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff:
See APA Manual (7th ed.), p. 299, sect. 9.35

Use live URL hyperlinks (indicated by blue underlined script).

Wensveen, J. G. (2015). Air transportation. A management perspective (8th ed.). Ashgate.
Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: APA 7th ed. no longer includes a publisher location preceding the publisher name.

Table 1

KSFO Parking and Fee Summary

Parking Location

Available Spots

Maximum Height

Parking Fees

Long-Term Surface Lot

826

n/a

$2.00 per 15 minutes

$18.00 max per 24 hours

International Garage G

1,172

8’2”

$2.00 per 15 minutes

$36.00 max per 24 hours

International Garage A

1,465

8’2”

$2.00 per 15 minutes

$36.00 max per 24 hours

Domestic Garage

4,314

6’6”

$2.00 per 15 minutes

$36.00 max per 24 hours

Valet

148

6’6”

$45 for the first 24 hours

After 24 hours:
$2.00 per 15 minutes, up to $45.00 max per 24 hours

Long-Term Garage

6,483

Garage 1: 6’10”
Garage 2: 8’2”

$2.00 per 15 minutes

$18.00 max per 24 hours

Note. Long-Term Surface Lot and Long-Term Garage $18.00 max rate per 24 hours
effective May 1, 2019. Adapted from “To, From & Around – Parking – At a Glance”.
April 17, 2020, from https://www.flysfo.com/to-from/parking. Copyright (n.d.) by Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: If no copyright date is available (or at least a copyright year), use (n.d.) for no date and include the date(s) you retrieved the content from the source(s) used to create the table.

If a copyright date/year is available, but the content in the table is likely to change, include the date(s) the content was retrieved from the source(s); if it is not likely to change, no retrieval date is required when a copyright date/year is available.

Be sure to include the table source(s) in the references list, even if the source(s) are not cited elsewhere in the text of the paper.
San Francisco International Airport.

Figure 1

San Francisco International Airport (SFO) Traveler/Visitor Parking

Note. April 17, 2020, from https://www.flysfo.com/to-from/parking. Copyright (n.d.) by San Francisco International Airport. Comment by Jorgensen, Jeff: If no copyright date is available (or at least a copyright year), use (n.d.) for no date and include the date you copied the figure from the source.

However, if the figure is likely to be revised in the future, even if a copyright date/year is available, include the date the figure was copied from the source.

If a copyright date/year is available, but it is not likely to be revised in the future, omit the date the figure was copied. Use, “Note: From https://www…”

Include the figure source in the references list, even if the source is not cited elsewhere in the text of the paper.

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